Thank You, Jeeves

 

Bertie is in his apartment playing his banjolele and feeling pensive. He then shares with Jeeves of seeing Stoker and his daughter, Pauline in town, Jeeves stating their presence shouldn’t effect him regardless of what had happened in New York. Jeeves does make the point of they being in town should scarcely mean he’d run into them, London being a place where it was easy to avoid people, apparently. Bertie then proceeds to mention whom he’d seen with them being Lord Chuffnell’s Aunt Myrtle and Glossop. Jeeves then mentions Roderick Glossop had asked to meet with Bertie, surprising him due to their rocky encounters in the past. Bertie is so flabbergasted by this and uninterested in confrontation, he commands Jeeves to borrow a neighbor’s dog to sic upon Glossop. Bertie then gives detail to why he’d react so poorly to such news. After, why he’d decided to act unaccommodating is shown, but since Glossop had arrived whilst Bertie was playing his banjolele, he was in a light-hearted mood and also thought the only reason Glossop could be there was to apologize, but when Bertie greets Glossop with magnanimity, he’s given nothing more than a grunt. Bertie is about to match his cold demeanor when Glossop lays into his sanity again and how his playing of the beloved instrument was annoying his neighbors, in particular one of Glossop’s patients, and he was there to unceremoniously attempt to get Bertie to stop, but Bertie had been annoyed by the yappy dog owned by the woman downstairs and so Glossop promises the issue wouldn’t be at an end yet, which for Bertie was the case, for after doing a musical set, he receives a call from the manager of the building which gave him the option to either stop playing or move, Bertie choosing to leave, then informing Jeeves. When Jeeves makes it clear he would put notice if Bertie planned on moving to the country, Bertie attempts to pep talk him into staying even after learning Jeeves could barely take the playing as well, the accepting of his resignation soon following.

Bertie then goes walking and upon turning a corner in Piccadilly, sees Chuffy. A bit of background on him and his status is related, Bertie considering he may have a place for him to rent. Chuffy though, had a lunch meeting with no other than Glossop, Bertie doing his best to talk him out of it, but due to the possibility of Glossop wanting his estate for the summer, couldn’t risk it and promises to dine with Bertie the next night, which Bertie states of being unable to do for leaving, wanting to know if he could hook him up with a cabin, Chuffy able to with ease. Bertie then mentions of having let go Jeeves upon questioning, Chuffy seeming quite interested. Bertie going off to the Drones after, and considering how he would have other musicians (of the black persuasion, this being the second time mentioned in a no longer used form, sort of way) to learn from due to their musical prowess. Bertie then speaks to Jeeves once more to make sure he had no guilt in his decision to leave, Jeeves letting him know Chuffy had offered a position to him which he accepted, Bertie now miffed Chuffy’d given him the wrong impression with his inquiries, Bertie then letting Jeeves know they would be in the same area and made a meeting spot.

Bertie mentions how the boys at the Drones had reacted to his sharing of leaving. They believing he’d be bored to death, but after a few days of being in his new home, had no feeling in this regard whatsoever. After, he debates whether to add more scenic details to his description of his environment, having received opposing opinions, Bertie decides to keep it short, detailing what he saw, then of his new valet, Brinkley speaking with the Sergeant, Bertie including how a yacht had docked in the harbour during the night. The mention of Brinkley then makes me certain of the show covering this story, it playing out a bit differently, but soon beginning to match up, fairly. Bertie then hears his car horn honking and upon seeing the boy pushing it, almost supplies him with a whack, but then realizing he’s Chuffy’s aunt’s son, reeling himself in. Seabury’s ranking among other terrible children Bertie had met is listed, he making the top five. Seabury then shares he was there to invite Bertie to lunch, so Bertie informs his man and drives off with the kid, he then learning it was a party and it being too late to go back to change. Seabury then shares of how they were now staying with Chuffy due to a stink in their home, Bertie making a joke and the boy shutting him down, then asking for money for protection, Bertie declining. When he arrives and parks, Bertie asks Chuffy about his cousin’s odd request, Chuffy explaining Seabury’s reasoning, Bertie noting how Chuffy seemed different and inquiring further in this area. When Chuffy responds cryptically, Bertie asks plainly why he’s so happy, Chuffy relenting, even though Bertie admitted to being unable to keep a secret, it being Chuffy’s aunt would soon marry Glossop. Bertie not seeing the good in this set up other than Glossop and Seabury completely deserving each other, Chuffy attempting to convince Bertie to start liking Glossop for his sake, but agreeably gives in when he knows it won’t happen. Bertie then discovers whom Glossop had found to take Chuffy’s estate off his hands, as well next seeing Stoker pulling up with his daughter, Pauline, son Dwight, and Glossop himself.

This lineup had taken Bertie by surprise, he attempting to act as respectably as possibly, to cover his reddening face. Meanwhile Chuffy hadn’t noticed the two men staring at Bertie with distaste, Pauline greeting him warmly and unphased by the males with her staring with varying degrees of indifference. Pauline goes on to explain how she tried getting in touch with Bertie and he dazedly mentioning having left town, she seeing as much. Soon after a little more awkward conversation, Lady Chuffnell ushers the group in and leaves Bertie whom hadn’t noticed until he was alone with Chuffy once more, whom was looking at him oddly. Chuffy wondered how well Bertie must know Pauline, the response being he didn’t much at all, Chuffy stating it seemed much more with how she acted and Bertie confirming she treated everyone this way. Chuffy undoubtedly giving the impression of having a thing for her with how he responds. Chuffy then inquires what areas of conversation to avoid with Stoker, Bertie deciding anything involving him would be a bad idea and he being better off to sit out the afternoon gathering, Chuffy agreeing if Bertie’s assessment was accurate. Once Chuffy decides he should join the others, Bertie mentions he also noticing the squirrelly way Chuffy acted whilst talking about Pauline, Bertie seeming a bit annoyed, but since they did have many common qualities, he seeing the value of helping the two nurture the budding romance. Bertie gets the chance to broach the subject with Pauline when she gets him alone outside and sits on a bench, Bertie starting with the reason he’d come there. Pauline then speaks of her father and Glossop not being Bertie’s biggest fans, she then easing into the subject of Chuffy, which upon using his first name, confuses Bertie for not having heard it before, but then Pauline defends him and makes Bertie look at her sideways. Pauline revealing she knows he likes her back, but hasn’t said so yet which confuses her, Bertie assuring due to the few days which have passed she should give him time, she confiding a strange, dreamy, fantasy of  what Chuffy reminded her of, and Bertie not getting why she’d have such a thought, she unable to explain, and after Bertie mentions how men go through certain measures before making declarative steps, Pauline notices someone approach, Bertie realizing it was Jeeves.

Jeeves is there to inform of Pauline’s father asking after her, Bertie confirming what she’d said to him was in the forefront of his mind, and then speaking with Jeeves with plans to leave, then considers asking his advice regardless of their differences, Jeeves lending his ear. Bertie begins by making certain Jeeves knew of Chuffy’s feelings for Pauline, he agreeing and Bertie knowing Chuffy being a quick operator, didn’t understand what could be holding him back. Jeeves brings insight, it being caused by Chuffy’s financial straits, then going on to share where Stoker had gotten his fortune, Bertie surprised by the amount and specifics Jeeves had on the subject. Jeeves also mentions how Chuffy had assured of Stoker signing by using himself as a bargaining chip, and for all of Jeeves’ good ideas, he currently didn’t have one which would work to aide Chuffy. Bertie then decides he’ll use jealousy as a way to get Chuffy moving, Jeeves not agreeing with Bertie’s fuel to get Chuffy going, but Bertie having decided he didn’t mind a knock from a buddy if it meant helping him get the girl, then asking Jeeves to supply him with sandwiches and drink, and when to begin informing the desirables to begin flocking to him, Jeeves going along without a fight.

When Jeeves returns with the requested snackies, he also mentions of no news regarding the sale of Chuffy’s estate, but of a party for Dwight being held on the yacht with everyone present invited, the two boys one upping the other on experience with yachts, Stoker deflating the ego fight by mentioning of hiring the black minstrels for the boy’s birthday which descended the two in another ego fight, but Jeeves had completed his part of Bertie’s plan, one issue arising since Pauline and Chuffy had been chatting and could potentially arrive together, Jeeves knowing a way of detaining Chuffy for a spot longer. Pauline finally arrives and before she could say what she was beginning to say, Bertie sees whom he believes is Chuffy coming and plants a kiss on her head, but instead noted it was Pauline’s father, Bertie lucky the man hadn’t kicked him for already believing Pauline and he were more than friendly, instead retrieving his daughter and walking off, dirty look at Bertie intact all the while. Chuffy then comes to confront Bertie about he not mentioning having been engaged to Pauline, Bertie not believing it important due to its being short lived, then realizing he’d been lucky Chuffy hadn’t seen the failed kiss due to his serious disposition currently. Once learning Bertie no longer had feelings for Pauline and she had feelings for Chuffy, he relaxed, then stated he’d already become engaged to her and Stoker had agreed to buy his home. Bertie then going to see Jeeves whom mentioned the spiked tension between the youngsters of the group once more, which damaged the deal of Stoker buying the estate due to the sequence of events which followed, Bertie quite pleased by the fates of the two boys involved, Jeeves concluding the story by giving everyone’s current whereabouts. Bertie then inquires how Jeeves had come by the information of why Stoker planned on keeping Pauline on the yacht for the remainder of their stay, which worried Bertie since it involved his kiss and Chuffy having overheard the conversation as well, he wanting to display his anger upon Bertie. Jeeves then comes up with the idea of Bertie giving the intention of only doing so in congratulations of their engagement and was only brotherly in nature, Bertie needing to meditate over getting away with this plan. Jeeves had then properly assumed Chuffy would be awaiting Bertie’s arrival back at his cottage, Chuffy popping up as soon as Bertie made his presence known, acting intimidating. Bertie does insert the story of the intention behind his kiss and after a few moments, Chuffy calms and declares he would still be marrying Pauline, regardless of his financial stability. Bertie then mentions how Jeeves could be Pauline and Chuffy’s go between by letter to set up a meeting since Chuffy had agreed with Stoker of he being Jeeves’ new employer. After perfecting his plan, Chuffy backslides into doubt, Bertie having to repeatedly confirm there was nothing between he and Pauline, Chuffy in the end taking his word. Bertie then deciding he’s going to town for a bite and show, relieving Brinkley for the night, whom he didn’t care for at all. When Bertie had returned to his room, he found a shocking sight of Pauline in his bed and pajamas.

Bertie then investigates why Pauline had swam ashore to his bedroom, soon learning Jeeves had helped her and had also mentioned of Bertie being pleased to help accompanied with a backward compliment, Bertie getting hung up on it a bit. Pauline then continues about how she got in and if Brinkley were to have seen her he would’ve heard her enter, especially having done so through his bedroom, Bertie now wondering where the man could be. Pauline suggesting he may have gone on a crawl, in which case they should be safe, when a knock on the door is heard. She thought it could be her father and doused the candle, making Bertie more ill at ease, whomever at the door not letting up the knocking regardless. When Bertie does finally get the door he’s happy to discover it isn’t Stoker, but the Sergeant and his nephew, the young officer reporting of the broken window and mentioning seeing someone enter, they now insisting on searching the house. Bertie shuts this down quickly enough even after the Sergeant goes on a bit about police being blocked from doing their job, after which Bertie informs Pauline he’ll be retiring to the garage. As he makes the walk though, he’s interrupted by the Sergeant once more, apologizing and letting Bertie on his way, he attempting to get comfy in his car and failing, due to the Sergeant making another misplaced appearance and apologizing, now thinking Bertie was an odd duck, but once being left, Bertie knowing sleep would evade him, then he decides to try a tool shed he’d seen on the grounds. After getting comfortable and even becoming sleepy again, he’s again interrupted by the officers, Bertie becoming quite annoyed and deciding officers should have a touch of being shackled if this was going to be the way he was hassled. After making it clear whom he was to the two interlopers once more, they start their apologetic spiel and discussed reasons of Bertie being a bit odd to choose these places for sleep, but finally leave and Bertie having his moment of unconsciousness taken away once again by Chuffy.

How well received Bertie reacts to visits from his buddies is regarded, with the exception of the timing being right, this not a prime moment. What’s more, the Sergeant was present as well, the man explaining he’d found Chuffy near the harbour, Bertie thinking how much more convenient it could’ve been if he’d come early enough to see Pauline ashore. Instead Bertie found himself again having to defend his reasons for sleeping outside, Chuffy not understanding his argument for having a comfortable bed indoors, Bertie comes up with it being caused by a spider, thinking the idea was the perfect deterrent, but found out soon enough this had only made Chuffy decide to have he and the Sergeant escort him upstairs and kill the bug, Bertie aghast at the possibility. So due to not having a proper explanation handy, he low blows the Sergeant and dashes off, but only runs into a garden-related tool, the men carrying him into his cottage and straight into his bed with no surprising guests, to Bertie’s bewilderment. Chuffy then dismisses the Sergeant and goes about getting Bertie more comfortable, whilst Pauline emerges from her hiding place and happily greets Chuffy whom stares at her, quite unsure what to make of her presence there. She unaware of his confusion and not so happy look, goes to him only to be turned away which then makes her ask why he was reacting so coldly. After a few words from Chuffy, she slowly comprehends how she must look and becomes angry. Chuffy thinking he knows what’s been going on and revealing how he knew of she and Bertie’s short engagement and still thought there was warm feelings between them, Pauline not setting him straight, but declaring her pure dislike of him, not wanting to see him again and Bertie interjecting with details of an uncle whom had pigs, due to being a part of the subject between Pauline and Chuffy. In the end, Chuffy gracelessly makes his exit, Pauline making her view clear of she not caring about his pain from his spill toward the door, physically or otherwise.

Pauline then requests Bertie to leave the room so she could change and return to the yacht, Bertie hoping for a conversation about Chuffy, but she not wanting to think of him anymore. Bertie mistakenly pressing the matter even after she threatened violence upon his head, and despite getting his word in, she maintains her return and Bertie is left alone to fail sleeping, feeling sorry for the two ex-lovers. So he goes downstairs and after fixing himself a drink, discovers a letter from Pauline which mentioned having taken his coat and a rowboat back instead. After Bertie felt calm enough to contemplate sleep once more, he receives a knock on the door, expecting the Sergeant again, but getting an eyeful of Stoker, whom didn’t look kindly at all. He lets himself in and Bertie has an opportunity to answer smartly to his inquiries, then stating his daughter was in his premises, and after searching to uncover nothing, apologizes and wonders where she could be, Bertie seeing the moment most likely being something it wasn’t, similar to seeming Stoker’s equal. After Stoker leaves, Bertie makes sure no one else will turn up before turning in, the next time being woken by tweeting birdies and readying himself for breakfast.

After which he noted how he seemed too happy for the events he’d witnessed not long earlier, he believing he should be planning for a reunion when Jeeves pays him a visit. Bertie takes the time to catch him up on the previous evening’s misfortune and asks for Jeeves expertise, he needing time and was there to deliver a letter from Stoker which contained an invitation. Jeeves shares how it may have been caused by the conversation he’d had with Stoker earlier, having spoken with him of the events occurring in New York, revealing the other side to Glossop’s stories of Bertie. Which upon hearing Stoker having amended his views on Bertie and turning on Glossop, he thanks Jeeves for his efforts and decides to accept the invite for being able to plead Chuffy’s insanity, Jeeves building on his unformed idea with using the quarrel inflaming Chuffy’s unwellness. Bertie then gives confirmation of the time he should be expected and next he’s on board, Stoker mentioning how small of a dinner party it would be with Pauline feeling ill, Bertie’s plan going up in smoke. Conversation was scarce during the meal, but when they were having their after-dinner smoke, Bertie landed on a topic Stoker could entertain, it being about his yacht. Stoker then offers to show Bertie around, going to the bedrooms, and through politeness gets Bertie inside one of the rooms, locking him in.

After a little time waiting, Stoker returns, being vague as to why he’d placed Bertie in his current confinement, only sharing he was setting up the concert, Bertie having him explain the reason in detail, Stoker sharing he’d been stopped by the Sergeant to identify a person in his custody and it being Pauline. After hearing his perspective on what must have occurred, Bertie’s unable to defend any reason Pauline would’ve been inside his cottage, especially after stating otherwise. Despite this though, Stoker’s mentioning all this was to ensure he no longer thought of Bertie the same way and wouldn’t be opposing his engagement to Pauline, Bertie taken aback, but doesn’t confirm his thought being correct, which lets Stoker continue his extended reason for Bertie being detained was so he couldn’t give reason to leave until the wedding happened, he leaving to get back to his son’s party and sending his man with pajamas for Bertie. Meanwhile Bertie was struggling with his upcoming matrimonial setup due to knowing the love Pauline and Chuffy must still have for each other. When Jeeves arrives with said bed items, Bertie believes he’s safe once hearing Jeeves had spoken with Pauline, but Jeeves puts him straight by making him aware, Pauline hadn’t shown negativity toward their scheduled betrothal.

Next Jeeves supplies the idea of Bertie fleeing the yacht if acceptable to him, he mentioning what would be acquired if Bertie wanted to do so successfully, upon hearing it, Bertie thinking Jeeves had cracked, but he explaining of the minstrels leaving soon since their performance had finished, Bertie able to make a getaway with them, he now in typical awe of Jeeves’ intellect and says as much, then laying back for the smearing of shoe polish. After implementing the plan and it concluding with no hitches, Jeeves stands with Bertie outside his gate getting seriously amused by Bertie’s appearance, Bertie inquiring what his next steps should be, and Jeeves listing off the bullet points, the more important of which had Bertie preparing a trip out of the country to lie low. Bertie then asks after Jeeves, he stating he’ll be going back to Chuffy’s employ and Bertie thanking him once more (the title making it clear this is what the story would reflect) and mentioning including a little something when he wrote to him with his whereabouts. Bertie, satisfied with being alone since Brinkley still hadn’t turned up, but also due to his state of appearance, was attempting a wash which does nothing, he about to obtain butter, remembering this was necessary in getting shoe polish removed, when he heard a sound downstairs, thinking of the possibility it could be Stoker, and so being quiet and careful, upon listening further, heard whomever throwing items about in the sitting room, he making out the figure to be a drunk Brinkley. Bertie shouts at him and once Brinkley realizes where the voice had come from, picks up a knife and goes after Bertie, thinking him devilish, Bertie having forgotten his state, dashes back to his bedroom in pure terror, and then a description of how he’d have shared this tale with his nonexistent grandchildren to indicate camaraderie with them of his fear and how his reception of Stoker at this moment would’ve been warmly welcomed.

Bertie then speaking to Brinkley through the door to assure him of his identity, Brinkley thinking Bertie was inside the room with the devil and, Bertie hearing another person outside with Brinkley, soon realizes it was the Sergeant. Thinking at first he was saved and then figuring, perhaps not, due to his appearance and the Sergeant’s penchant for detainment which didn’t suit Bertie for his current trouble with Stoker. As Bertie listened, Brinkley now sounded quite sober whilst explaining what he thought had happened to Bertie inside the bedroom with the devil, but the Sergeant focused on Brinkley’s weapon currently in hand. Once circling to Brinkley’s reasons for said knife, the Sergeant knocks, but Bertie doesn’t speak, and Brinkley excuses himself, Bertie then looking out the window and deciding this would be an acceptable means of avoiding the situation, beginning to devise his accessories to do so, but this doesn’t do much good for the Sergeant having seen Brinkley decide to overturn a lamp to set the cottage ablaze, the two fleeing outdoors and Bertie still in his room until seeing the happy little flame appear. Bertie noting of taking his banjolele until remembering where he’d left it, currently couldn’t be reached, jumping out the window hastily. He runs off and sits himself a fair distance away in the wood, contemplating his next steps, which again gets hung up on his lack of banjolele and soon switches to how to acquire butter, so he could catch the train, ending with trailing Jeeves to Chuffy’s to impress upon him the task of fetching butter. Bertie makes his little trip successfully and without getting too lost on the way, being seen by a worker of the house and scaring her to the floor.

Bertie reflects on how a reaction so severe could be caused by something so insignificant as shoe polish and how if he’d only had a tan she may well have treated him with formal greeting. Bertie decides to withdraw once hearing people notice the girls reaction from inside. He goes to the front of the house and considers his next move, hearing Seabury yelling, making Bertie content. He then views someone he believed he recognized until then figuring whom he actually saw was Brinkley, he making such a loud knock, he was met by Chuffy himself, not pleased by his abrasive action and giving Brinkley a chase with periodic kick for Chuffy not being receptive to his question of whether the devil had paid him a visit. Bertie takes the opportunity to ask Chuffy for some butter since he can’t seem to get in touch with Jeeves, and so gets right behind Chuffy as he passes and scares the daylights out of him, not considering doing it gently until too late. Chuffy still doesn’t give Bertie a decent response of being happy to see him, so Bertie attempts to butter him up a bit, as it were, congratulating him on his butt-kicking, explaining whom Brinkley was to him, and what he’d done to the cottage. When Chuffy gets a better view of what Bertie looks like, he again wonders of Bertie’s sobriety, Bertie proving himself sound-ish of mind and ready to detail his adventure fully, so he could finally ask for the butter he required to catch the train. Once finishing his tale, Bertie could sense it wasn’t hitting an empathetic ear, especially when Chuffy shows surprise of Bertie trying to escape when a beautiful girl was ready to marry him, and her father giving his blessing. Bertie mentions of how she loved Chuffy though, and he denying this, he stating whilst he did love her she obviously wanted Bertie due to swimming right to him last night. Chuffy deciding he wouldn’t supply butter, but would wait until Bertie saw sense and went through with marrying Pauline, since he wanted her happy. After Chuffy stalks off, Bertie has gone deep into thought for some time and not noticing Jeeves turn up, until finally picking up on his gentle way of getting his attention.

Bertie again, had a great way of using metaphor in being relieved in seeing Jeeves, soon relaying what had happened since the Bertie’s escape off the yacht. After conclusion, Jeeves offers to obtain butter as well as some other little relaxants to ease Bertie’s stresses. Bertie then asks after what had happened to Seabury, Jeeves updating him and how it had been resolved, the answer being outlandish in reference to whom they referred. Being more surprising was the one in question agreeing to black face whilst constituting the entertainment for Seabury. He having in mind to set up some trickery for Glossop due to unpaid protection fee, Bertie then remembering to send Jeeves hastily for butter, waiting for his return, but not before hearing Seabury start shouting again. Bertie sees an odd sight of Glossop emerging, Jeeves reporting what he’d heard from an eye witness whom worked there, Glossop’s engagement off as a result. Jeeves then noting how Glossop would soon be in a tight spot for his appearance, Bertie feeling sorry for him and detailing how he would’ve reacted if Glossop had been his buddy. Jeeves then had to break the news of Seabury having emptied the house of butter for his vengeful plan.

Bertie was stunned once more by his unfortunate situation, wanting Jeeves to show more emotion in these situations, but as it was, only being able to offer a place for Bertie to spend the night until morning so Jeeves could bring him the necessities to wash himself. As Bertie walked to the other house for the night, he thought of those responsible for his current unhappiness, he realizing he maintained a change of heart towards Glossop. By this time Bertie had reached his destination and began to cautiously break in, reminding himself of the failed B and E’s he’s had before, but Bertie then seeing the back door open a little, he now even more timid for the possibilities of what he could run into within. Bertie soon learning Brinkley was inside, and what his next move would be. Bertie for the second time, being glad he waited since he soon heard some shouting, at first receding, and then heading straight at Bertie, the object of Brinkley’s insanity now being correctly identified. After Brinkley locked himself back inside, Bertie makes himself known to Glossop, he taking it the most subdued, but still needing time to recover from his run in with Brinkley. Bertie agrees the two of them must at this moment put aside their differences and work together, Glossop then sharing of what had occurred after Bertie had seen him leave Chuffnell Hall, Bertie then having to confess they wouldn’t have shelter at his cottage, as well as the inability to wash, and the reason. This returned Glossop’s dower mood, until he cleverly figured the garage was still available to them and with it, petrol to wash up in, Bertie not seeing the value in returning for himself so shares with Glossop of having to journey alone, he wanting to await Jeeves, then confiding how Glossop would have to break into the garage, the two parting after making lunch plans for a future date.

Bertie then confesses the comfort level a summer house brings, it being severely low, and now thinking how he should’ve went with Glossop so he could wash immediately and even drive to London rather than taking a train. Bertie couldn’t bring himself to go through with it though, knowing the Sergeant would be too close for comfort and so lays back and tries to sleep. This time succeeding even after giving up, waking in the morning ready to lay in to some nonexistent breakfast and then deciding to see if Jeeves had arrived, getting paranoid he could miss him. When he’s close he spies a parlour-maid setting out a tray with morning snackies which Bertie couldn’t ignore, thinking he had it planned well, but upon testing his theory, heard someone outside the door as he’s lifting the tray cover, so instead hides at the desk to hear Jeeves making a phone call, he not disturbed at all, finishing his call, and inquiring why Bertie had stopped back at Chuffy’s residence, Bertie explaining the situation, and Jeeves filling Bertie in to Lady Chuffnell’s new outlook, Bertie now ready to consume the breakfast when he heard someone new about to enter, so hides once more, it being Stoker.

Bertie would’ve liked to have viewed the scene, but settled to listen as Stoker began with some heat regarding Jeeves’ quick retreat, and upon having Jeeves explain, is silent for a moment, then thanks Jeeves for having saved him from possible legal issues. Stoker inquires if Bertie had been seen and where he was heading, Stoker deciding to take a walk to the Dower house once Jeeves had shared Bertie’s plans. After Bertie has time to pop back up to bleed his being awe-struck by Jeeves again, he must retreat again for Pauline entering. After which she seemingly had an enlightening conversation with Jeeves about Bertie, the status of Lady Chuffnell, and Chuffy, she going off, but then Bertie hearing someone getting into the breakfast tray and thinking Pauline had come back, Bertie aching in knowing the lovely kippers were being consumed. So even whilst knowing popping up on people didn’t work well, he did so upon Pauline whom handled it not well at all, Chuffy finally making an appearance and sweeping Pauline off her terrified feet, she glad to be swept as Bertie witnessed.

Bertie considers the situation he watched was one which shown whether a man maintained a chivalrous nature, Bertie being subjected to a sight he didn’t wish to see or hear and so withdrawing back under the table, and when Chuffy had calmed Pauline a bit, he asks what had frightened her, Bertie deciding this to be an ample time to reappear. Chuffy looking annoyed, but everyone seeming a bit O-k with his current look now and so Bertie brings up with Chuffy the matter of his first name and wanting to discuss it in more detail, mentioning having a laugh at the Drones about it, Chuffy getting serious about what would happen if Bertie did. Bertie then shares a story which makes Chuffy demand he cease, Bertie’s intention to attempt to show how close Pauline and he had been. Bertie then reminds them how Pauline’s father still believed she was marrying him, but he assuring her he’d handle it, which was met with humorous incredulity, Bertie having the chance to prove himself as they hear footsteps approach. They see Stoker looking a bit worn, Pauline asking what had happened, he confessing his trek to the Dower house being met with a man throwing potatoes, Bertie thinking of how admirable Brinkley’s opinionated attitude was when required, and surprising Stoker with his appearance, giving an amusing reason for looking burnt. Bertie then gets on track with beginning his break down of whom Pauline would marry. Unfortunately for them all, Stoker wasn’t having it, Chuffy not taking his stubbornness well, Bertie then admiring the shiner Stoker had received from a thrown potato, knowing how difficult it was from personal experience. Then upon Stoker learning Glossop had beat the shit out of Seabury, he began reconsidering not buying the estate out of spite since it was what Chuffy had been relying on so he could marry Pauline, but then Pauline ruined their progress after mentioning he could apologize to Glossop, Bertie sensing it going south. Everyone became stuck in the ugly silence until Jeeves drifts in with a telegram for Stoker, but made it sound epic for the details, Stoker not impressed and grabbing the letter. Once reading it he learns the will which would’ve made them rich was being disputed, so they could lose everything, Chuffy then excited since he’d be on the same level as Pauline and they could resume their plans. Stoker planning on fighting the dispute, mentioning Glossop’s help, the group wondering how he would manage this due to their little falling out, Stoker now seeing their fight through different eyes, believing they were like brothers who fought. Jeeves then comes in again, Stoker hastily dismissing him even though Jeeves was attempting to assert of knowing where Glossop currently was since none of them knew for certain.

Jeeves withdraws and everyone calls him back for the the news being Glossop had been arrested and placed in the larger of two potting sheds on the grounds which the describing of was about to give Stoker a popped blood vessel. Why the Sergeant’s nephew had put him there is shared, it making sense but still being an odd choice. After getting the completed story as to where Sergeant Dobson was, and the nephew currently awaiting Chuffy due to his status as Justice of the Peace, Jeeves exits and Lady Chuffnell then enters with barely an acknowledgement toward Bertie’s black face, but goes to Chuffy, upset about Glossop’s arrest. Then Stoker realizes the futility of having Glossop testify for him since being found in black face, as well (making him seem cuckoo). Everyone then loses track of what to do, Bertie having given up temporarily, until ringing Jeeves and reminding Chuffy of his usefulness, then recapping Jeeves of the situation to receive a simple fix in response which aggravates Stoker once more, but in the end decides if he can get them out of this nonsense he should like to hear it, Bertie cutting Jeeves off to be certain of two terms, of which being certain Stoker would purchase Chuffnell Hall, and wouldn’t force Pauline upon Bertie. Jeeves then suggests an easy way of getting Dobson away from the shed, and due to his orders, wouldn’t admit to disobeying. Stoker does bring up the good point of whether the cops were able to figure it out or not, if they spoke about it, as they inevitably would, the story would get out. Instead Jeeves proposed Bertie be substitute for Glossop as prisoner which once Bertie keeps attempting to discover reasons not to be put through the short end, everyone starts rubbing the ole ego, softening him up, but what seals it is the promise of breakfast, Bertie following Jeeves out.

The aftermath of Bertie’s breakfast is described, he and Jeeves discussing the happenings of the day being quite stressful, the sight of Chuffy in his Justice of the Peace “uniform” throwing Bertie off, but he praising Jeeves for his part being played well, even learning of the letter of the will being contested was a contrivance of Jeeves, Bertie now saddened in knowing the odds of Jeeves ever being on the market for reemployment being slim. When Jeeves enquires Bertie’s next move, he shares he planned on going back to his apartment in the city due to his banjolele being crisped in the fire and wasn’t getting another, Brinkley having tainted his love of the instrument. Jeeves then asks whether Bertie would consider rehiring him since he didn’t have the interest of being in a married man’s employ. The question shocks Bertie, but thanks Jeeves and the story ends. As entertaining as the others and I hope to get it for my personal library soon.

The Fallacy of Success

This piece dives right into it’s subject which is plainly stated in the title, Chesterton makes certain to give examples to other genres before seriously laying into the matter of point, but once doing so, doesn’t let up, giving specific reasons to support his side throughout the article.

Chesterton starts by describing different sides of the spectrum of the genre of focus, then lands on chivalry and religion at least being about their respective subjects whilst the genre of success is about “nothing”. He continues by relating these texts claim to tell of how men can succeed in anything, but the writers themselves not even being able to succeed in doing their job of writing about the subject correctly. Chesterton states the idea of success doesn’t exist, but then allows this is because success is in anything if one looks at the available examples given: “Any live man has succeeded in living; any dead man may have succeeded in committing suicide.” , as well as listing a couple others. He goes on to explain how writers of success try to convince those who read their subject matter can be helped to succeed in their specific area of need, but how if it were any other person writing about a distinct subject and didn’t actually deliver in seeming to know about what they were writing of, the piece would certainly not be published.

Chesterton reiterates his argument of people who write of success and those who’ve obtained it don’t have the knowledge of why this is so. He then informs of two ways one is successful, one of which most (hopefully) would rather choose, but some would be satisfied with the underhanded way of procuring the desired gem. We learn by Chesterton’s deductions of how one would usually try to go about learning a specific subject, those including the seeker being a natural, a cheat or acquiring books on the various subjects relating to the talent wanted, but the idea of going straight for a book on success due to the general statements within such a text shouldn’t be at the forefront of one’s mind.

We get another couple of examples of how a book on success would go about giving “advice” on how to attain triumph over one’s various endeavors, but how empty they would seem since it would lack detailed strategies about how one could potentially go about this. Chesterton then shares an article title of success about Lord Rothschild which he found odd and entertaining going on to add some article excerpts after, including a description of Vanderbilt’s background, he having been a millionaire and his successes, this obvious selection was given due to its sober evaluation of how whilst one couldn’t necessarily find success the same way, it gave the optimism it was still possible for others, Chesterton listing this article as, “…the horrible mysticism of money.” He perceives the author was in awe of Vanderbilt’s ability to have been given such success, but was only giving a fanboy list of Vanderbilt’s achievements rather than truly knowing how he’d become one of the few and the sparkling and celebrating Vanderbilt’s mysterious wealth.

Chesterton then debunks another statement by the same author which brings to light his careful cover up of facts to support his theory on those who were able to succeed, showing some mentioned, didn’t stay successful. Chesterton then admits how whilst he’d read about the figures mentioned and knowing he might not be able to fall into success easily, he admitted to also having not tried, preferring to focus on other more attainable pleasures. He begins to wind down with statements of how he doesn’t deny others’ successes, but had felt they may have been keeping something hidden and hoping people would soon come to disdain these success books as they should (which people still struggle with today, obviously) since all it seems to do is educate people on how to be conceited and give a false sense of experience. Chesterton ends with how some qualities should be preferred over the ones made to seem important, for instance the want of doing good work for not the possibility of becoming rich, but for being good at one’s job, he ending with the question of what could happen to those who are encouraged to attain greatness through their indecency rather than morality.

I quite enjoyed Chesterton’s flow and giving entertaining examples as to the absurdity of what authors of success books try to do with their “work”. There didn’t seem to be any arguments on the subject since I can relate to his viewpoint on success or D.I.Y. books. Chesterton set out to describe the lack of facts to back up what success writers publish, and I believe he succeeded (gold star, Chesterton, already ahead of the game). He sets out his arguments with viable representations of the facts and regardless of how long ago it was written, it still holds up even by today’s standards. Whilst this is just one article from a collection, I may some day decide to read the rest, but for now I’ll be glad to continue my reading of him with Father Brown.

Bone Vol. 7: Ghost Circles

For the 6th volume. We begin with Ted waking Jonathan to learn what has been going on, Ted realizing the news Jonathan had, wasn’t good and learning Lucius had done something which endangered Gran’ma Ben and Phoney Bone. Ted then discovers Jonathan had seen something questionable happen which made him think this, and Ted reasoning there must be a viable answer for it, the bug then easing Jonathan’s mind on he telling the Stick-eater Headmaster of what he’d seen. We then see Wendell being summoned to the main gate by the Headmaster due to tremors getting more noticeable, the Headmaster noting how he spoke, his conduct disclosing his obvious feelings about the Stick-eaters and how Lucius wasn’t one of them, the orders of the monks not coinciding with his own goals and being too hung up on Rose and devoted to her and her sister, Briar. This leads into Wendell discussing  with the Stick-eater about the disappearance of Gran’ma Ben and Phoney, the reason for the war beginning, and their disappearances lying on Phoney’s head, to which the Stick-eater discusses why his notion is ludicrous. The Stick-eater then shows Wendell the crest of the Harvestar family, he not recognizing it but being told of the purpose of the current keepers of “the source”, Wendell then uncovering how serious the legend of the Lord of the Locusts actually was. When they hear an explosion, the attack begins, Wendell being told to go and lead the villagers whilst the Stick-eater Headmaster took care of business on his end. We then get a close up of the destruction occurring at the mountain, seeing Gran’ma Ben leading Thorn and the Bones through the exploding rocks. When Fone almost gets crushed by a statue, he realizes they are going the wrong way, even though they were heading down, but then they are confronted by Kingdok, Thorn looking straight at him until Gran’ma Ben pushes her and Fone out of the way, Kingdok trying to bite them and getting a mouthful of rubble. They all get behind another statue and Gran’ma Ben uses it to throw at Kingdok, he busy spouting death threats.

They all retreat as Kingdok continues his pursuit, Fone looking for a secret passage which will get them down the mountain safely, Phoney thinking he’s crazy and Smiley the one to discover it, everyone piling in before Kingdok can lunge at them again, Gran’ma Ben offering to hold off Kingdok, but Phoney hearing something in the tunnel, they having no choice but to continue, and Fone remembering and warning everyone of how the tunnel had made them hallucinate the first time around, Gran’ma Ben knowing this for having been there before, as well. Thorn is first to speak up about leading them deeper through the tunnel, Gran’ma Ben advising the Bones to get ready to run, she grabbing them as she let Kingdok’s face push through. Another explosion gets Kingdok’s attention and then we see the fighting amongst the rat creatures, villagers, and Stick-eaters. The Stick-eater Headmaster is ordering one of his men to deal with a gathering of enemies when they see the explosion on the mountain, his orders changing to get as many villagers and men into a cave, knowing there won’t be time for proper refuge from the danger to come. We then see Briar being revived by the Lord of the Locusts and learning she had configured their powers incorrectly, losing part of them and being told to fix her mistake. Meanwhile the Bones are continuing down the stairs of the passage and wondering if they’d missed a turn for having been walking awhile, Fone starting to notice he and his cousins were starting to take on the personalities of the characters in Moby Dick, soon realizing he’s sharing the hallucination with the other Bones. Gran’ma Ben then calls them further down where Thorn has collapsed and is ice cold despite the extreme heat they were all feeling and we find she had seen Thorn being invaded by the locusts and confiding in the Bones of this.

When Thorn revives and shares of speaking with the Lord of the Locusts, Gran’ma Ben relates to this story by confessing of how she had the same experience many years before (the details of which are in Rose and isn’t needed to complete this volume). She relates of following her sister to the cave and being confronted by the Lord of the Locusts, Thorn finishing for her by supplying what he’d been searching for, she being saved by Fone before the Lord of the Locusts had found her dreaming power source. Thorn then shares with Gran’ma Ben of a mistake regarding her sister’s abilities, they heading for a light source up ahead which turns out to be the end of the tunnel, they thinking it was snowing until realizing they are seeing ashes in the wind and everything’s gone. Thorn then speaks of only some of the destruction being real, Briar having used many ghost circles to give the illusion of everything being destroyed, sharing with them of she able of seeing where they must walk, but having to follow her exactly, failing to do so would mean the walker being gone forever. Fone asks how Thorn would reverse the changes, she unsure, but knowing it’s possible for how Fone had given her the charm necessary to repel the Lord of the Locusts and she having the missing powers Briar is searching for. As the Bones follow Gran’ma and Thorn, they argue about whether they believe the ladies about the ghost circles and all the fantastical creatures mentioned, Fone not interested in rocking the boat, especially when he and his cousins were attired like his Moby Dick dream. Phoney then lays into Fone about how he consistently seemed to come up with a reason why they couldn’t escape and go home, he making Fone promise the next time he figures a way out, he’ll drop everything and come with him, Fone reluctantly agreeing.

Meanwhile Gran’ma Ben reaches the spot she’d left Lucius and is becoming upset about not seeing him there, Thorn trying to calm her by speaking of the possibility she may still be able to help him, she attempting to see if she could sense him, but when it fails, has a vivid vision with Fone there, he seeing a new place and Thorn warning him to stay close to her, they finally returning to the others, Gran’ma Ben is relieved to hear of the trees surrounding them since she had left Lucius elsewhere. They then go toward the spring Thorn had noticed and stop for the night for Phoney requesting desperately for a break. Smiley then speaks frankly to Fone about whether he was feeling homesick and how they didn’t have to listen to Phoney all the time due to his usually being wrong, Fone seeming to be surprised by Smiley’s insight. Smiley going on to mention how even though Fone believed dreams didn’t mean anything, Smiley saw Fone react as if he’d dreamt something and told the others of Thorn being alright when she’d still been lost. Fone dismisses this and goes to sleep, dreaming of being in the middle of the ocean on a casket, and sinking under water. Fone then sees a large body, it coming into focus as being the Red Dragon, Fone attempting to get his attention and failing, the Dragon opening his mouth to yawn and inhaling Fone, we soon only seeing a spark.

Fone awakens to everyone gone, but is called to by Smiley whom was bathing, then mentioning Phoney had woken without his pirate look. Fone then has a bad feeling of Thorn being in danger, but Phoney trying to calm him, mentioning where she was and how she and Gran’ma Ben had argued about where they should head, Thorn thinking back to Old Man’s Cave, it having less ghost circles than going south, Gran’ma Ben wanting to head south. Neither Gran’ma Ben nor Thorn could pick up anything from the veiled world, Thorn only noticing the ghost circles seemed to be spreading. She then describes what the ghost circles signified, it having to do with the dreaming and the real world getting mixed. Fone then asking how the piece of the locust inside Thorn could be removed, which leads into why Gran’ma Ben wanted to head south to Atheia, where help could be found. Gran’ma Ben is still attempting to discover signs of life from the villagers, but soon hears sounds on the other side of a ridge, everyone seeing it was a slew of rat creatures. Due to where they were headed and they not having noticed Thorn and gang, they would now have to head south, Phoney agreeing, and assuring Smiley it didn’t matter if it took them further away from Boneville (giving the sense the little grifter had a devious plan), Phoney sharing quietly what he was thinking with Smiley.

As the group then discusses whether the rat creatures may have actually noticed them, they run right into them. As they attempt escape, Thorn and Fone get separated from Gran’ma Ben, Phoney, and Smiley, but Smiley then sees someone whom makes him smile. We then seeing Thorn and Fone trapped at the edge of a cliff, Thorn threatening to kill the Hooded One, she of course dead already, but sharing of how two would be needed to help the Lord of the Locust, Thorn not wanting to take part, and Briar attempting to convince her of the good she could do with the power it would give her, then confessing how her parents were responsible for her death and how they had actually died, then confiding when they would perform the ritual. As Fone defends Thorn though, it is revealed he also had a piece of the Locust within him which meant she no longer needed Thorn, but as Briar seemed about to do something terrible, she’s bum rushed by Smiley on a rat creature. The group now reunited, Thorn is thrown on Bartleby with Smiley as the rest ran after, Thorn stating she’d be able to lead them through the ghost circles as the herd of rat creatures again headed towards them.

As they traveled down a dune, Thorn describes their current route being filled with ghost circles and would need to slow down so they could navigate through them, which they implement as they see rat creatures disappearing due to stepping in the wrong spots. They stop after some distance, Thorn wanting to take a break, but Phoney eager to push on for thinking they weren’t quite safe yet, the group moving once more. We then see Wendell picking up robes nearby a bunch of dead, then being called since the group had found Lucius, he being carried and they describing how and where they’d found him. Wendell wakes Lucius, whom’s memories are hazy after the blast, after deducing Jonathan not being as fine as Wendell made it seem, they then being approached by the Stick-eaters, the Headmaster wanting to know if Lucius knew where Thorn and Rose were, he not knowing, but did know where they’d go if they had survived, the Headmaster not seeing the logic behind it, regardless of it being the place of their throne and believing Atheia was deserted, then stating Lucius was an enemy of the royals and to place guards outside the infirmary.

We then see Thorn and group still on their trek across deserted land, Thorn stopping them for the ghost circles getting thicker, she thinking it would be the opposite as they got closer. Phoney decides they were breaking, and it soon leads to him accusing Fone of being the cause of the trouble, the rat creatures not even going after the others anymore, only Fone, Smiley shocking the two with his electric fingers, then Gran’ma Ben interrupting Phoney’s revelation of they being chased because of what the Hooded One had said of only needing Fone for the ritual, to let them know of the new path they would walk. Gran’ma Ben deciding she’ll bring up the rear, for now being suspicious of Fone’s part which could be played, and everyone walking a longer, but safer way around to Atheia. Bartleby then informs Fone of Smiley falling, Thorn warning him to be careful not to fall into ghost circles already avoided as he rushes to aid him. When they reach Smiley, he indicates his fall was due to “taco”, he being hungry, of course. Phoney then comes up with the idea of Thorn and one other should go into a ghost circle to search for food, she considering the idea, Fone offering to go with her again and the two going in before logic set in, they near a farmhouse and Thorn sensing a family within, not alive but moving, they grabbing fruits, but then Thorn hears a sound, she figuring it was the family, which spooks her and drags Fone away, but too quickly since he dropped their loot.

Thorn continues to hear the dead call to her for help, then relaying a message from her mother, also warning her of how to extract the locust piece from Fone and of the Hooded One being close. Thorn and Fone escape before the Hooded One gets near, and then we see Lucius getting a visit from Wendell, they discussing the Headmaster being stubborn on moving the camp and whether the villagers were willing to travel to meet the Atheians. Wendell then begins asking Lucius of his connection to Rose and her sister and whom he’d been with when he was found by Jonathan. Lucius admits his story from his youth when he’d fallen for one of the sisters, and after Wendell spoke of his concerns, Lucius decided they were going to leave. We then hear from Bartleby speaking of the rat creatures superstitions about their tails and other parts of them which were medically altered, Fone inquiring what had happened when Bartleby had returned to them, the rat creatures shunning him due to believing he wouldn’t eat the Bones and group when it was necessary, he admitting the truth to the statement, Thorn then collapsing and Gran’ma Ben reassuring of they finally reaching where the ghost circles thinned. Fone is ready for them to go through Tanen Gard in order to reach the people who can help Thorn, then being more wary when Gran’ma Ben mentions of  the trespassing penalties if caught; it being of a serious nature.

Thorn is becoming weaker as they journey on, Fone mentioning to Gran’ma Ben of what he felt when Thorn had returned them, Gran’ma Ben trying to push them more quickly, especially after Thorn mentions of the Hooded One coming. As Phoney and Smiley struggle to follow Fone, Gran’ma Ben, and Thorn, Smiley mentions how he felt ill at ease and likening it to a story of their youths when Phoney had prompted Smiley to steal pies off of windowsills, they going through the dragon graveyard feeling similarly wrong. Fone then runs to them to share the news of discovering a way across the possibly bottomless crevasse, when the ground begins to shake. Bartleby recognizes the smell first and shouts of dragons coming from the pit, everyone rushing to the slim way across, Fone being the first to slip, but being caught by Thorn, whom at first had to be carried by Gran’ma Ben, but she relaying how she was starting to feel better due to Tanen Gard, they continuing across. When they get across, which is also the end of Tanen Gard, Thorn mentions of they being clear of ghost circles and the hope of the villager survivors making their way to Atheia since she still couldn’t sense Old Man’s Cave. We then see Wendell leading the villagers toward the Stick-eater guarding Lucius, they disarming him. The Headmaster meets Lucius as he’s walking out of his cell, he again mentioning of only destruction anywhere else and they being safe there. After Lucius shares how he can’t understand why they were protecting their brotherhood when everyone was going to die anyways, the Headmaster shows his face, and finally agrees to accompany them to the Old Kingdom. We then see Kingdok surrounded by darkness and walking somewhere. Gran’ma Ben is guiding the group to higher ground for a better view of where they were heading. When they reach the top, Gran’ma Ben breaks down how long it would take them to reach Atheia and what they could have in store with two days out with no cover. Smiley and Phoney have a little quarrel which Bartleby concludes by confessing of Smiley being “aces”; this volume coming to a close and making me start the next, immediately! If my statement isn’t a testament of the staying power and greatness of this series, then I’ll be blunt: It’s quite good and if other readers have made it this far there’s no sense in stopping now.

Bone: Trilogy Tour II – Rose

trilogy-tour-ii

For the sixth volume. I found this story should probably be read after the 7th volume, but doesn’t really hurt anything, only makes the flashbacks of Rose flow a little better. This seems to be a background story for Rose which has us start with seeing her coming back for her dogs who are glad to see her, she being pleased they’d obeyed her orders to stay where she left them and giving them a treat, the Red Dragon appearing to tell her she must get back to what she’d been originally meant to be doing with her time. Rose gives in after defending her reason for being out, the dogs sad to leave their bones behind, but the three going off, Rose wondering why she was sent on this quest by her mother, she then seeing Briar, her sister going up the side of a mountain and deciding she should follow her to see where she was going, even though Briar was supposed to be attending a class with Rose. Rose is noticed before long and chases after her despite the terrifying omen of shouting for her to flee which she ignores and is soon overcome by locusts, deciding she’ll continue forward to discover what was going on and this being where the story ends, but most likely will continue in another volume. Before completely finishing the side-story, we get a two page throw-away of Phoney Bone and Smiley in which Phoney asks why the townspeople don’t like him and Smiley believing it had to do with his unabashed love of greed and Phoney and Smiley coming up with ideas of how they could get the townspeople to admit they either loved greed or at least could warm up to it, the two believing a political party or religion centering around greed would work, but abandoning the idea in the end leaving us with the idea of the irony of their plan.

Castle Waiting is a separate comic, beginning with a nun on a picnic visiting a grave and being interrupted by an imp from Hell masquerading as someone she’d known, until she’d figured out it was a trick, the little demon going on to argue how similar they were, and she shouldn’t be so up in arms around him, whilst she offers a type of cookie not common in his fiery home. After being certain there wasn’t anything holy in the ingredients, he munches gladly and then offers to walk her to her vehicle, the nun then wondering how the creature could be walking on hallowed earth, the imp stating how it wasn’t as off-limits as it seemed and could even foot through her church if he so desired, she wondering why he didn’t then, and upon the imp learning he wasn’t barred, getting a wink as she bikes away, he calling it “a date”, and poofing into nothingness. Iiiinteresting, I may have to look further into this.

Scary Godmother begins with a little girl, Hannah Marie, her scary godmother, and the two hosting a tea party, a little boy, Orson, spying on what they were up to with a bear called Harry. Orson wanted to join in, but Harry holds him back for believing it was only for the females, since his mother had stopped him from eating the finger sammies she’d been preparing, Harry left to fend for his own tummy. Then, upon Orson hearing about the best shrimp puffs and the one man allowed to attend having arrived, he insists they figure a way to get invited, Harry not wanting to miss the “boo-fay”. Hannah Marie is then prompted to share a story as Mr. Pettibone grabs the door, Harry and Orson masquerading as exterminators and offering a limited time offer to dust the bugs, but Pettibone declares it’s unnecessary, due to another attendee having already taken care of this. The two resort to attempting to get through an outside window, but fail to make it, Orson greeting his father as the two sat, forlorn under a tree to admit their want. His father suggest he ask, Orson going for it, and Mr. Pettibone immediately allowing them entry after sprucing up their outfits, Orson now more interested in the party games then the snackies, but Harry staying focused on the plentiful variety of yum-yums. As the two sit and listen to Hannah Marie’s story though, their resolve fades a bit with boredom along with the constant story-telling and chat, but Harry finally gets his mouth full, which keeps him content. Orson is bad mouthing the state of the stories he’d had to listen to, not realizing until too late Scary Godmother was listening, she unphased and offering he share the next story, Orson down for this, but then walking in to Harry getting into the story of a series, and starting with the first one, since Hannah Marie hadn’t heard of them, Orson dreading how long this would take, Harry successfully boring everyone to sleep, then contemplating his plan for pizza and if Scary Godmother had a running bill he could take advantage of, since the party hadn’t covered what they would do for supper. Weeks later, Scary Godmother is asking Skully if he remembered ordering a multi-hell-layered pizza, he denying able to stomach it. Entertaining, but not my cuppa, which was also covered at the tea party! Har Har!

Akiko was mentioned being a stand-alone, so those who didn’t know of it could be properly introduced to the main characters (hooray for me!) It begins with a child, Kiko and an oddly looking super-hero whom looks like Neil Gaiman, called Spuckler, in search of a Mr. Beeba, they discovering a path of books where he’d been, a robot, Gax bringing this to their attention. Kiko is certain he’s been kidnapped, but Spuckler isn’t sure Mr. Beeba had the foresight to unload such a perfect plan for them to locate him so easily, Kiko not arguing, only certain they needed to get to him quickly, running off. Mr. Beeba is then shown caught in a web and attempting to sweet talk a “monster” out of harming him. Kiko and Spuckler arrive outside a cave where the book trail ends, Spuckler insisting they needed a game plan before rushing in to a place where a large creature was mostly likely lurking, he having seen massive footprints. Spuckler relieves Gax of a sharp looking implement upon his robot-hood (near his neck, pervs!), and leads them inside, he warning them to hang back a bit, and rightly so, as he’s attempting to threaten the big fella into releasing Mr. Beeba, but instead getting entwined in the creatures tongue. Mr. Beeba confesses how much entertainment he’d gotten from Spuckler’s failure, they fortunately saved by Poog, a round face which sings unintelligible words, the creature lulled to sleep and everyone returning outside, Spuckler grateful, but relating how he’d like to discuss further a way to implement Poog’s talent upon requirement, so he didn’t look a fool next time. Not bad, I believe I’d read more if I had the means or was quite bored.

Usagi Yojimbo is about a ninja rabbit, Usagi, whom also guest appeared on The Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles show. Usagi is in this episode called, The Guardian, and immediately has to choose which path he will go down, allowing a butterfly to make the decision, and he following complacently. He walks on to see a samurai, he greeting him pleasantly, but when the fully armored samurai stays in his way, he learns of his leader preventing any “enemy” entry. When Usagi denies being an enemy, the guard relates of anyone not under the rule of his master was an enemy, and Usagi properly disgusted by this, decides to announce of locating another way to cross, unfortunately, the guard denies him this idea, since he could be going back to inform his friends of his leader’s defenses, Usagi confiding he was a ronin and traveled alone. This guard was on guard though, and declared of all enemies dying, Usagi backed into his metaphorical corner to the point of having to teach this fool a lesson, readying to fight. Usagi pulls a fast one, and jumps over the samurai into the water, believing his armor would prevent him quick pursuit, Usagi correct and slicing him, but as he’s retreating, the samurai returns a blow and states of not failing his leader again. Usagi next wakes to a couple of monkeys (literally a couple, they referring to each other as “husband” and “wife”) wondering if he had survived, soon learning this to be so as Usagi opens his eyes. He’s shocked to see he hadn’t been killed, and then can’t believe the bridge which had been guarded was years older and broken, the couple sharing how the civil wars had brought the bridge down, a samurai having caused enemies to get through and gave the general such a good fight, he almost lost, and in his rage, trashed the bridge and the ghost unable to leave his failed mission after death. The couple then asked why he hadn’t taken the newer bridge across the way and must have gone down the wrong path, Usagi blaming the butterfly and attempting to cut it down in anger, the two monkeys regarding him with confusion as he continued to attempt to split the butterfly. Now this is entertaining, I could definitely see myself reading more of these, if I can find them.

The final comic is a two-page Bone throwaway, Smiley and Phoney discussing why Phoney was so despised in the village, Smiley figuring it was because of Phoney’s blatant selfish greed. Phoney doesn’t buy this though, since in his mind, people understood greed and only couldn’t come to terms with it. The idea of if they were able to convince people they truly did love greed, they’d have them wrapped around their little finger, Smiley building on this by suggesting he turn it into a political party, so the people would love him because they’d be voting for him, Phoney taking it a step further and thinking a religion would work much better, then almost drooling with the thought of combining the two and having an uber-greed dual politico-religion. In the end though, disbelieving it could work and going back to washing dishes whilst Smiley dried. I loves ’em! Next is the cross-over of Castle Waiting and the Bones!

Mrs. Dalloway

I had decided to postpone reading The Hours since I’d heard it was fruitful to begin with Mrs. Dalloway due to there being nods throughout the former and I wanted to be sure I would catch them, which I started to notice almost straight from the start of beginning this.

We commence with Mrs. Dalloway going to buy flowers whilst Lucy stayed and prepared for the party, I’m assuming, it would come later. Mrs. Clarissa Dalloway is eighteen (which is mentioned in The Hours, but for a different reason) and musing about a phrase Peter Walsh had told her as she walked. It’s June, and Peter will be back from the war soon, they residing in London. Clarissa continues to give pictures of what the city was doing during the day until she runs into one of her old friends, Hugh. He greets her familiarly and she answers his question of where she was headed with why she enjoyed walking in London; Mmk. Hugh, like most of his family, came to London to visit a doctor, he going on behalf of his ill wife who had, it is hinted, womanly issues to attend, but despite which would be coming to her party later, if not a bit late himself for his job detaining him. Peter, the jealous and for the most part, surly type, had a problem with her friendship with Peter, even though he was married, but Clarissa forgave his brashness with being agreeable to walk with her in the mornings; what very simple requirements. She then reviews the right reasons she made in not marrying him and whilst she’d moved on, she felt a little betrayed, it seemed in knowing he had done so, as well. She then considers what book she should give to a woman in a nursing home, Evelyn Whitbread, before choosing nothing and going on her way.

Clarissa then speaks of how she habitually did certain things to influence how people thought of her and her regrets in doing so. Then considering how she’d feel more comfortable as someone else she knew, but currently how even her identity as Clarissa was overshadowed by whom she married, making her Mrs. Dalloway. Clarissa then moves on to speak of how much she enjoyed Bond Street in the morning and how her daughter, Elizabeth differed from herself on the enjoyment of gloves. She also describes her daughter’s temperament to those she didn’t care for from church and one woman in particular, a Miss Kilman she felt opposite for, but Clarissa didn’t like a bit. Clarissa then goes on to consider why she felt such hate and believed it stemmed from love of herself overriding any decent feelings toward Miss Kilman. After coming to this conclusion, she reaches the flower shop which would hold flowers for Clarissa when she had parties, so upon going in and conversing with the florist, Miss Pym, she then gets caught up in talking of the flowers and how they glowed by a certain time of day. Clarissa then believes she hears a gun go off, but Miss Pym relates how it must be another car which had gone by, taking the blame for its noise and then noticing how the car having back-fired, was now parked across the street and the one driving, pulling the blinds on the windows before anyone could get a good look at the supposedly important man within. Those on the street were contemplating who it could be as well, Clarissa believing it was the Queen running specifically mentioned errands. As the car moves on slowly, the same reaction occurs to the people on the street, but soon they become distracted by an airplane writing something in the air and don’t notice nor care about the vehicle now going through the gate of Buckingham Palace.

Lucrezia and Septimus, who are introduced earlier as people are watching the airplane, but now revisit them as they are sitting on a park bench, Lucrezia trying to engage Septimus in interests other than the ones which isolate him. She believed he had something wrong with him, but when she brings him to the doctor, he can’t detect anything and have him try to take interest in certain outdoor activities. Lucrezia meanwhile doesn’t feel like she can share her issues with him with anyone, meanwhile Septimus is shown having deep thoughts he wished to put on paper but being interrupted by Lucrezia trying to get his attention per the request of his physician, he only getting annoyed and distracted. To add to both of their annoyance they then are approached by a young lady, Maisie who had just come to visit London and doesn’t get treated kindly by Lucrezia making her wish she hadn’t ever decided to go there at all. A woman looking from afar at Maisie’s experience whilst she is feeding the birds, her thoughts on marriage given and what the airplane in the sky reminded her of.

Clarissa hadn’t noticed the airplane until she’d just arrived home, but hadn’t even been given time to register what it was when her maid shuts the door, then being told of a phone call which related a Millicent Bruton was inviting her husband for lunch and Clarissa hadn’t been invited with him. This news also disappointing her since she’d heard Lady Bruton’s get-together’s were something to boast of. Clarissa’s sleeping arrangement is shared due to her trouble getting to sleep, as well as the first mention of her proclivity for both women and men (not straight out, but clear enough to understand). She relates a story of Richard trying to quietly get upstairs and hurting himself in the process and then reminiscing about an old girl friend of hers and trying to associate the relationship with love. Clarissa mentions her meeting of Sally and how she seemed to be enamored by not only her looks, but interests as well. Her thoughts on Sally are shared, and a time jump into the future has occurred or she had been from the beginning, fifty-two years old and was only reminiscing about her past. Besides which, she felt like she would be told she looked older by Peter or whomever when he returned. She then goes on to think of her party she would soon be throwing and still chafing from her lack of invite by Lady Bruton. Now though, she went in search of the dress she planned to wear later and considered mending it herself since her maids were busy with other things in preparation. Once her servants began inquiring as to whether she wished them to help her mend the dress, she would thank them repeatedly and decline due to they having enough to do already, then revealing whom she’d gotten the dress from and how she wanted, but never would, visit Sally Parker.

Clarissa then stayed deep in thought whilst mending her dress about where she’d worn it and metaphors in reference to it until she hears the doorbell and Peter Walsh makes his way in to visit with her. Clarissa is surprised he calling on her so early before her party, but very glad he’d come to see her since she would have found he’d been back in town for a day if she’d read his letter. Peter also didn’t have long to stay since he was going to the country, but asked of Richard and Elizabeth, also wondering about the dress she’d been interrupted of mending, Clarissa responding by answering half of his first question, catching him up and then making sure he didn’t mind if she got back to fixing her dress for the party. Clarissa then toys with him by confessing she wouldn’t invite him to the party and he asking her why, she wondering why she’d decided not to marry him all those years ago, they then reminiscing of an old home and his visits with her father during the days he wanted to marry her, he now imagining them surrounded by a moonlit scenery.

Peter than contemplates sharing his news, but begins talking himself out of it for not seeming to live up to Clarissa and all the Dalloways’ standards; In the end though, Clarissa asks him what’s been going on with him which gives him the lead in he needs to declare he’d fallen in love. Clarissa taking his being love-struck in stride even though she seems to be a little irked he isn’t referring to her, she asking who the woman is and he realizing she’s an Indian woman married to a man in the Indian army with two small children and he’s just waiting to see his lawyer. Clarissa then realizes how lucky she is to not have married him and focuses on how he’s become love smitten once more. Peter also realizes the trouble he’s in for just trying to get his love divorced so they could marry and this apparently brings him to tears with Clarissa comforting him, but whilst doing this began thinking how she yearned to tag along with him on his adventures soon feeling as if they’d lived a whole life together and she was nearing the end. Peter then asks Clarissa if she’s happy with Richard which she’s saved from answering by her daughter, Elizabeth entering and she introducing her to him, which he then takes his cue to leave, but not before Clarissa rushes after him to remind he should come to her party.

Peter’s perspective is shown as he’s walking down the street with Clarissa’s last words to him revolving in his mind and how he couldn’t understand, but didn’t fault her for her need of the socializing ploy. Peter’s interest in mechanics is shared, moving back to Clarissa and how she’d changed subjects by acknowledging her daughter’s entrance into the room, Peter being slightly annoyed by how she’d phrased it and noticing how Elizabeth must have felt the same, he soon thinking of how Clarissa hadn’t changed temperament since her youth and feeling a bit of a fool about how he’d broken down in front of her, but he seeming to have a penchant to do so in front of Clarissa. Peter than has the puzzling thought of Clarissa’s interaction with him including some sort of refusal, which may have been in reference to her not answering his question, but this all happens whilst he’s getting ready and not seeming to be aware of it, then having a thought as the clock strikes half-past eleven and the last bell tolls, he thinks of Clarissa’s life ending, remembering a physical  ailment she was dealing with and it giving him a spring to his step to get a move on. Peter then considers the possibility of Richard being able to hook him up with a job whilst some young English soldiers pass him on the street. Peter dwells on the soldiers for a while and then considers how no one but Clarissa knew he was back in London and being in Trafalgar Square providing a feeling of being free, giving an impression of his youth he hadn’t had for a very long time. He then spies a young woman whom grabs his attention so soundly he decides to follow her; always a great idea. Peter than fancies how he’d distract from the idea he’s following her if she noticed his presence by offering to grab a drink and she automatically agreeing; Have to love those fantasies. He starts to lose her on the street as it began to get congested, though, but is able to follow her until she enters a private residence, he then remembering Clarissa’s repetitive words.

Peter considers where his family originates and his indifference to the Indian army and imagines how he’d pass his time as he came to these conclusions, he then thinking of his youth and how this was brought to his mind because of Clarissa and how females tended to live in the past more than men. Peter sits down after this and goes back to his thoughts of Elizabeth and her “queer” look and then analyzing why Clarissa had introduced her the way she had. Peter than decides he’ll want to speak with Elizabeth again as he’s on the verge of a nap in the park and seeing him reach deeper unconsciousness. He wakes with a start and remembers the time he’d been dreaming of, it being in the summer in the early “‘nineties” and being deeply in love with Clarissa. The moment he remembers includes Clarissa imitating a woman in an unstylish dress and realiizng a fact which makes her state she couldn’t socialize with her anymore which tainted Peter’s love of her, even though he understood it was caused by her naïveté and the fact he couldn’t stand how she could go along as if nothing had occurred, driving him crazy, but still over-ruled by his love, even though her words would keep him in a funk for some time after. When they sit for supper, Peter than notices Clarissa, he having sat near her aunt, is sitting near another young man and her quirky mistake of calling Mr. Dalloway another name, is their first introduction and Peter’s sixth sense in knowing Clarissa would marry him. After Peter realizes this, they still have a good time socializing at the party, but he seems to be in denial after and must confront Clarissa another day, to be certain of their courtship being over, he not taking it as in stride as he’d done when he’d thought of it. He then remembers the last time they saw each other before coming back to his senses in the park, having the realization of the distractions life gave him to ease his pain of losing Clarissa and watching a little girl’s antics near a pond.

Lucrezia has come to her last bit of patience toward Septimus when a little girl runs into her and she has someone to comfort and after the child runs back to her nurse, Lucrezia considers she must return to Septimus for how late it was getting and needing to see Sir William Bradshaw. Lucrezia then remembers how odd Septimus could get with certain ideas he argued were reasonable. Septimus’ perspective is given as he has some “strange” thoughts and listens to a boy with a penny-whistle down on the street below his room. When Lucrezia comes in to ask him the time, he has trouble focusing on her question, but after being led back to reality he wavers between seeing a dead friend and then going to Peter’s perspective seeing them as he walks through the park and comparing London life to how he’d been living in India. His thoughts then move to a young woman who had married young to a rich man, someone he never would have suspected to do this. Sally being whom he was thinking of, ponders how she was Clarissa’s only best friend whom could see beyond people’s social behavior and was able to call out “bullshit”. Background of Hugh is mentioned, whom Sally despised for reasons unknown and to whom he was married. A memory of Mr. Dalloway being quite sensible is shared, and realizing why Clarissa must have fallen for him and then discovering Clarissa may have the better judge of character than Sally, she also having the ability to immerse herself in her own little world regardless of her actual surroundings.

Through Peter’s musings (of whom I almost forget is narrating due to the prolonged thought process), he settles with thoughts of Clarissa’s nature and must be sure to insist he doesn’t love her anymore, but must be able to explain and mentions how Clarissa would own up to all of her flaws, being a very honest sort (I can relate). Whom the parties are usually for is then related and how Clarissa was a major believer in keeping oneself busy, after getting similarities between her favorite authors and using a metaphor she lived by and also describing her personality quirks which leads in to Elizabeth’s current stage of dealing with the elder friends of her mother. He then considers how the tables seemed to have turned for he and Clarissa, she now being in love with him and his thoughts of what men really think of having to compliment women once they reach their fifties. He then thinks of Daisy, his would-be fiancée and remembers a letter she wrote to him he knew her plan in mentioning certain details was only a ploy to try and hurt him for leaving on this sojourn to England. His reasons for being there besides attending Clarissa’s party is given and how passion is viewed differently in men’s eyes, he then becoming distracted by a strange sound whistling through the trees which makes him consider the situation the person who was making the sound would have gone through, he giving her a schilling before taking a taxi.

Lucrezia has now also noticed the woman and is feeling sorry for her as she’s about to walk across the street. She imagined people knowing of her sadness and wanting her feelings to be noticed, she hoping the doctor they were going to see will be able to help Septimus. A clerk who didn’t live well is visited, but self-educated himself by going to the library and writing to authors for suggestions on books to read (pretty good idea). Septimus’ past is shown on how he’d come to the city and his first love and her influence on his reading and writing. We learn what Septimus had volunteered to do, even though he was being eyed to move up in his clerk position. After losing a friend in the war, he meets Lucrezia whose family owned an inn, he immediately upon meeting her, becomes engaged with her. This is also the time he begins to have feelings of unnoticed panic and having moments with Lucrezia whilst she worked making hats. As Lucrezia is found to have a critical, but passionate eye for hats and outfits, Septimus is starting to become aware of his inability to feel emotion, but other parts of his brain seeming to work perfectly. When he’s taken his old position back as a clerk, they put him on a pedestal and he seems indifferent to their reaction, instead thinking of Shakespeare’s feelings toward humanity and then Lucrezia trimming hats and her thoughts of having a family at some point.

Lucrezia goes on to speak of what sex her child must be and the baby would be introduced to Shakespeare due to Septimus’ brilliant mind and if her requirement wasn’t satisfied she would be come inconsolably unhappy. This subject was the first to make Lucrezia cry since getting married and Septimus could feel no empathy for her loneliness for wanting a child. Septimus’ inability to navigate his lack of emotion pushed him into a deeper state of withdrawal and so Lucrezia calls the doctor whose diagnosis being there wasn’t a thing wrong with him and he may just need some time to unwind along with a few other home remedies. The doctor speaks to Septimus of trying to feel better at least for his wife, since his being bed-ridden was upsetting her and Lucrezia confessing later how the doctor had invited her to dinner, speaking of his four children and how Septimus was feeling abandoned because of her acceptance to the invitation which cycles him back to the idea of somehow giving up his life for the people around him, he figuring it wasn’t quite reasonable to do it for other people’s benefits since he did get some enjoyment out of the basic details of life, whether it be food or weather. When the doctor leaves and is soon called back by Lucrezia for being startled by Septimus talking nonsense to himself out loud again, the doctor prescribes him some medication which will help him sleep.

Big Ben rings twelve and Clarissa activities are mentioned of what she was doing before focusing on Sir William Bradshaw and how he would drive anywhere a patient needed him whilst “her ladyship” sometimes waited in the back seat of his car. She having the time to think of many random things including her husband and son and community affairs. Doctor Bradshaw had come to look in on Septimus as well, determining he could do with some time in the country, noting his behavior and accompanying illness the previous doctor was unable to diagnose. After giving Lucrezia all the information and what would be done for Septimus in his home, they bring the news to Septimus who doesn’t take it very well, but is thrust to accept his transfer of home temporarily so he could be a proper husband and live up to expectations at his work. After, background of how Sir William helped his patients, which whilst giving the patients’ families ease of mind, worked the patients themselves, up. Lucrezia though, not being among the norm in this frame of thought, disliking Doctor Bradshaw with definitive emotion. A digression involving Hugh Whitbread is given and what he did for the community and the reason he would never accept lunch with Lady Bruton, which then led to Mr. Dalloway meeting Lady Bruton on a doorstep.

A meal with Lady Bruton, Hugh, Miss Brush and Richard, is next, she having invited them under false pretenses and deciding when the proper time would be to break her news, she asking after Clarissa to Richard and Lady Bruton being after social and political acceptability more than pure friendship. An explanation is shared of what her question regarding Clarissa would have meant to other women as opposed to men and how they acted toward each other in the few moments they did run into each other. Lady Bruton than abruptly reveals Peter Walsh being in town once more and everyone in the room getting sparks of recognition and Richard seeming very pleased by the news. Lady Bruton  is seen waiting patiently until they are all smoking and has her maid get them papers before trying to segue to her point of the evening, but then seeming never to reveal it and Richard asking whether she’ll be joining Clarissa’s party, she uncertain for not having a taste for parties. When they leave she lies down for a moment and thinks of a memory with her mother and father when she had dirtied her dress and with this thought and of her other relatives, she goes deeper into sleep.

Richard and Hugh are next as they enter a jewelry shop, Hugh once realizing his usual jeweler wasn’t available decided he wouldn’t buy anything until he was in and Richard, finally deciding he would look for something for Clarissa, couldn’t figure out what to get since the last time he bought her jewelry it hadn’t made time as an accessory upon her. Whilst he struggled with the thought though, he became annoyed by Hugh’s conduct in announcing his decision to wait and so departs to find Clarissa. He decides upon arriving with flowers to announce his love for her, which doesn’t happen very often due to the awkward feeling of the process, but once he’d determined his plan, he then notices the lack of policing there was on the streets and how he was gathering evidence for malpractice quite often. He then considers his words of love for Clarissa once he confronts her and meanwhile walks through an area with poor families entertaining themselves. Richard also confronts how he’d at one time been jealous of Peter and Clarissa, but had his mind eased by Clarissa’s mindfulness of what she truly needed. As Richard reaches his destination, Clarissa is seen struggling with the idea of having to invite someone she didn’t really care for to her party and then being distracted and surprised by the late hour and of Richard walking in with roses, he unable to voice his words of love, but Clarissa understanding his unspoken meaning. The two speak of the party later and of Elizabeth’s current interest with a friend whom had just come by, both of them speaking of the visitors Clarissa had and of whom was at the lunch with Richard, he departing without saying the words he wanted to voice, but needing to get back to work and deal with some business, which Clarissa knew and accepted as she rested per Richard’s parting words due to a doctor giving this particular piece of advice at one time.

Clarissa was then aware she was unhappy about something and slowly figured out what it was which upon doing so, was instantly in better spirits since the subject matter was purely to do with others opinions of what she enjoyed, even at the risk of her health. When Elizabeth walks in to see Clarissa resting, her features are mentioned differing from the other Dalloways’ to suggest they had some deviation from their heritage somewhere and how her personality had changed from when she was a child. Meanwhile Miss Kilman, Elizabeth’s guest, waited on the stair and would be able to hear the conversation between Clarissa and Elizabeth, which the latter was aware. Miss Kilman’s background is shared and what she thought of Clarissa and Richard, establishing she taught Elizabeth history. When the two go out of the room and Clarissa is aware of Miss Kilman, Elizabeth goes to fetch some gloves which were left behind and Clarissa has a “stand off” with Miss Kilman over how she seemed to have such a hold on the girl and whilst Miss Kilman claimed to not hate Clarissa, she certainly felt the need to act coldly to her and felt well within her right to do so since she was paid to do a certain job and thought Clarissa was just a rich snob, which she seemed to be in her own way, likewise minus being rich. Before they get out the door, but still not quite in time, Clarissa tries to remind Elizabeth to come back on time for their party, she already out the door and a loud vehicle drowning her out. After Clarissa takes a moment to think of Miss Kilman in her perpetually sour state, she swiftly moves subject to Peter and his seemingly baffling taste in women. Clarissa then reminds herself she must call for some accouterments for her party and remembers how she must have insulted or hurt Miss Kilman with her reaction to her, thinking Miss Kilman may have held her in higher regard than she truly believed, knowing the woman looked at her with disdain, but still considered she must have been affected by Clarissa’s lighthearted response to her.

Miss Kilman is then shown dealing with her negative self-image and how Clarissa had it so easy, speaking of her issues with a Mr. Whitaker. After, they go shopping and have tea, Miss Kilman getting thwarted in having the cake she wanted due to a child snatching it up when the mother and child sat near them, she not taking it well at all. After, they go elsewhere to have tea and when Elizabeth is done, she divulges of wanting to leave, but Miss Kilman wishes her to stay since she hadn’t finished yet, so Elizabeth waits on her and Miss Kilman learns she will be attending her mother’s party and gives advice on how she should take parties with a grain of salt and Elizabeth not caring for them much anyways is then led into how Miss Kilman seemed to have possessive feelings for her. Elizabeth then sits through an awkward statement from Miss Kilman regarding her self pity, but how it outweighed the pity for others. Miss Kilman then goes to pray after Elizabeth finally flees and pays their bill, she meanwhile having a difficult time connecting to her spirituality and thoughts of the people she’d seen during the day which leads us to what Elizabeth was doing; waiting for an omnibus and feeling too exposed to the world as opposed to how she felt in the country with her father. She then considered the profession she’d prefer going into one day and how she’d spent so much time on the bus she may already need to get back home to change for dinner, but not knowing the hour it was, currently.

After Elizabeth has some time for a walk, she realizes it’s later than she believed and makes her way back, having being given the description of what the objects and scenery around her looked like and changing in the light, Septimus seeing the same things. (Which is one thing Virginia Woolf had going on for her, the almost imperceptible character-shifts.) Septimus is shown having those deep thought moments and Lucrezia worrying over him again, thinking back to his sometimes crazy thoughts she was demanded to write down and how one person reacted unfavorably in Septimus’ eyes once they’d read a part. After sitting for a few more moments, Septimus makes a comment about the hat Lucrezia was working on which reminded her of how he used to speak, seeming normal. They laughed over his thought of the hat and then goes about making it look even better by laying out the accessories Lucrezia would need to change the look according to his eye, which she knew was keen to sense certain odd styles. Having this moment between them made Lucrezia very happy, she trying the quirky looking hat on until a tap at the door indicated the girl with the paper had arrived. After Lucrezia returns the girl to her mother and Septimus wakes from his dozing off, he and she look at the notes she’d taken for him and how the night being referred had been so serene for the two it wasn’t fair how they’d be separated just because the doctor said it was best, Lucrezia confiding they couldn’t be forced to obey. Instead of burning his notes, as requested, Lucrezia decides to store them out of sight, since some of them were wonderful drawings.

When the two realize the doctor had come to escort Septimus out, Lucrezia stops him on the stair, but only for a few moments and Septimus, once realizing he had nothing to defend himself with, decides the only decision is to escape through the window, the results of which, aren’t favorable. Septimus is dealt with and Lucrezia is given something to aid her to sleep and then perspective goes to Peter. He beginning by having thoughts of how people act around emergency vehicles for having heard an ambulance pass and then takes himself back to a memory of he and Clarissa on an omnibus and gathering prized items from a certain market and then getting once more side-tracked by her daughter’s entrance until once again thinking of his and Clarissa’s good-ole-days until noting he’d gotten a letter from her and dreaded opening it for all the drama of feelings the two seemed to have for each other. Peter thinks of how he’d, for some reason wanted Clarissa to introduce Daisy if the opportunity arose and then learning his indulgent interests as he goes to dinner. After speaking with a family who he senses he’s completely delighted his presence with, he decides he’ll attend Clarissa’s party for the purpose of talking about the political happenings of India with Richard to learn what the English were doing out there. As he walks out of the restaurant and thinks of various subjects, he gets a paper and then starts thinking how cricket is an interest which is inescapable. Peter than walks one through how most people view parties and how different age-groups act in them and then noticing how the people of London seemed to all being going out to dinner, he then noting certain individuals who catch his eye.

When Peter reaches Clarissa’s house he notices her maid rushing around to fix any finishing touches to the furniture, etc., which could mean an official was coming, as well, but this not being impressive to Mrs. Walker, the cook. As the party was getting started and the men and women separated, Mrs. Walker is followed, whom is stressing about the salmon always being under cooked. As more people arrived, Peter among them, he then realizes his coming was probably a mistake, due to Clarissa taking on the pleasant hostess routine and he not knowing anyone there, now thinking staying in to read a book or going out to listen to music would have been more preferable. Then perspectives are changed a couple times to land on Clarissa’s cousin who felt like her invitation was a second thought since she’d received it late, she then seeing Peter Walsh and how Richard seemed very glad to see him after the latter had come to speak with her cordially. Clarissa is struggling with whether the party is yet a success and her role not feeling important, which was to stand and greet those who arrived, at the moment. Then Clarissa is greeted by a party crasher, Sally Seton, the two acting very pleased to see each other and as they catch up, the Prime Minister arriving and being ushered around by Richard for introductions, noticing how the man didn’t look important, naturally. Clarissa continues with the Prime Minister through the room and greets more people as they come in and when she interrupts some men who are laughing to ask what the joke is, none of them responding for propriety’s sake, most likely, she then overhearing a polar-opposed conversation between two men about Milton and thinking they weren’t hitting it off very well.

Clarissa continues to speak to certain individuals, one being her aunt and then wondering where Peter had gone, her aunt having had many memories in India. When she sees and leads him to her aunt, she promises to speak with him later and moves on to discover Lady Bruton. They speak for a moment until Lady Bruton notices Peter and engages his opinion of India since he’d just been there. After some time Clarissa gets the time to speak with Peter and then is interrupted by Lady Bradshaw announcing her lateness. She goes on to chat with Clarissa of various things until mentioning a young man who had killed himself earlier in the evening and the slow shock of how Lady Bradshaw could be using this as her conversation piece at Clarissa’s party. Clarissa is then taken by seeing an old woman getting ready for bed across from her window and the circling thought of the young man who died and why he’d done it, but not feeling sorry for him because of the party she had going on around her, making her appreciate life. Meanwhile Peter and Clarissa’s other old acquaintances and friends sat and rehashed the past, awaiting her to make her rounds so they could all talk together. As they wait for Clarissa, the round of conversations intermingle and end with Elizabeth being told by Richard how he had hardly recognized her as she was talking with someone, she pleased and Peter then realizing his excitement and figuring out the reason for it was Clarissa having reappeared.

Smooth and meandering story, the kind one would read during travel or at the beach, I enjoyed it more because I’ll be reading The Hours after, but Woolf has such an easy flow I may just have to read a few more of hers.

Ahmed and the Oblivion Machines

This story was inspired by Little Nemo in Slumberland, the comic. We begin with Ahmed who falls off of his camel and loses the caravan he was following and notices a bird, wondering where it was going and if he or his father would fly one day, his father replying it would be another year; In this sense the story is already strange, this conversation with his father occurring before he’d fallen and been left behind, asleep and getting covered by sand until morning, when he realizes he’s now alone and thinking of what he could have done wrong to be living with such a dire fate he expects will come from his current situation. Ahmed soon uncovers a figure under the sand and prays for direction and hope his life won’t end so young, not getting and answer until he wept upon the face. Ahmed doesn’t notice the first movements of the god though, until he speaks, surprising Ahmed, the two then introducing themselves and we learning the god is named Gonn-Ben-Allah. Gonn requests Ahmed to finish digging him up, stating he shouldn’t fear death any longer if he finishes releasing him. Soon Ahmed is seeing darkness surround them, asking Gonn what it was and getting the answer of it being the “Enemy” as the other half was the “Savior”.

We then learn what the enemy is, Gonn needing Ahmed’s help as strength to the cause. Soon Gonn is making it so Ahmed’s wish of flight will come true, speaking the words which would give Ahmed the gift of flight and upon getting his first taste of this, he then learns Gonn had the plan of needing to go to a place called Yestermorrow. Ahmed soon discovers what Gonn had in mind for him to see, which would be a place both in the past and future. When Ahmed soon believes he sees his father, it becomes a bad omen to Ahmed and brings both he and Gonn, falling to the sand. Gonn disappears beneath the sand and Ahmed tries to dig him out and only being able to again uncover him when he lets the thought of his father go, then being told he must dance and sing upon Gonn’s “grave”. When Ahmed had done enough, Gonn was able to burst out and take them both back into the air; This is reminding me a little of the Peter Pan way of thought, one needing to let go of their family: the past, in order to live freely for themselves in the future. With Ahmed properly letting go, he then sees the scenery has changed and creatures he hadn’t seen before soaring off of cliffs. The two then see recognizable characters from Greek mythology, a boy and his father and a set of golden wings about to be tried out and teaching Ahmed the value of trying everything worth experiencing, at least in Gonn’s words.

As Gonn explains his reasoning for this, they are distracted by an airship made of such delicate materials it’s blown away by Ahmed’s sneeze, they then seeing a hot-air balloon, one of the balloon’s not staying in the air for long, again giving Gonn the opportunity to remind Ahmed not to refuse any sight for they all will teach a lesson. Then they see another man trying to feel the gift of flight by attaching himself to a home-made kite, which takes him up in the air, only not for long; This part reminds me of a short story in The Flying Machine which is from the Emperor’s perspective, since the man on the kite is shot down by arrows with an Emperor’s sign on the darts. This gets no response from Ahmed this time and he then confides in Gonn of how he wishes he could see his father, the god then advising him he must be patient to help give him life, since he was more like a dream in this current state and Ahmed could help him become “real”. Gonn then shows Ahmed tall buildings which men would build so high as to touch the sky and saw men who wished to fly so badly as to fling themselves off buildings with carpets under them and shouting words of flight which didn’t help their cause. Ahmed then sees the sky fill with machines Gonn dictating what words Ahmed must say to insure their forever existing. Ahmed continues to be coached by Gonn to get those asleep in bed to see the grand sight of all the machines in the air, this being the moment Gonn is horror-stricken with the idea he was going to fall out of the sky.

Ahmed soon understands why Gonn has thought this, it having to do with the sleepers who won’t awaken or won’t believe the sight to be seen, the gluttons and lazy people who will only sleep. Gonn soon is noticeably thinning to which Ahmed then decides he’ll be the one to save him, being the only one awake and powerful enough, he “proving” this by informing Gonn so and he taking his former girth. Ahmed then shares how he wished to learn more from Gonn about how he can make those who don’t, hear what he would shout to them, in essence, to be able to fly higher, faster, and longer. Gonn then confirms Ahmed had learned enough to take over where he’d left off and to return them to where he’d found him so he could cry happy tears to let him move on. Gonn confessing how he’d left his thumbprint on Ahmed when he was born and going into deeper symbology as he explains. Before Gonn goes back the way he’d come he makes an agreement with Ahmed for when he can return to see him once more, then Ahmed cries to allow Gonn back into the sand. Gonn helps Ahmed remember how to fly once more from within the sand and Ahmed then sees the caravan, his father the only one awake and mourning Ahmed, who bumps into him and praises Allah he was found. When Ahmed is about to go to sleep he makes certain Gonn is still with him who wished to be called by another name, then giving Ahmed a dream of his future.

This story was an odd, but entertaining, definitely a learning tool for children still wondering why certain days are tough and how to get through hurt feelings. Worth the read.

Bone Vol. 6: Old Man’s Cave

For the fifth volume. We discover Fone climbing a tree to get bearings as to where they were in the woods, Smiley waiting below. They’d been lost for days already and Fone still wasn’t familiar with the area, meanwhile Smiley is having trouble watching for Fone’s climb down due to a groundhog getting mad at Smiley for stepping on his home’s entrance, Fone having a moment to break his handhold and falling directly onto the groundhog. Ted the bug then finds Smiley as he’s trying to extricate Fone from his fall into the groundhog’s hole (ha ha) and Fone is as happy to see Ted, as well. The groundhog then overhears their happy reunion and who Fone was, getting scared since the rumor was Fone had killed Kingdok, he retreating inside, Ted then catching the Bones up on what had been going on, Fone getting angry with Phoney and they both being led by Ted back to where the village was.

We see Phoney in cover of the trees spying Thorn helping a family escape the burning village, meeting the rest in the brush before two groups of rat creatures approach from two sides of the clearing and everyone hiding in the darkness of the trees hoping not to be seen. The two rat creature group leaders speak of the news about Kingdok, one group leader not knowing the most recent news being of his death. The two group leaders then digress into another language which gives Wendell time to threaten Phoney for being the one with the star mentioned by the rat creatures and wanting to give him hell for getting them in this mess, Phoney cowering and knowing his words bore truth. Thorn then divulges she understood the language the two groups were speaking in, not knowing how but then giving orders as to where to take the new family and getting Wendell and a couple others to do what they had already done before, everyone having their tasks and Phoney surprised Thorn believed in his innocence. When Thorn and company get back, they don’t see the town, she making it clear they were in it already. Wendell gets newly enraged at the thought of everyone’s home being obliterated and chasing imaginary dragons because of Phoney, Thorn having to come to his rescue yet again, but not succeeding so Phoney lets out with Thorn’s secret which at first they have trouble believing.

Thorn then tries to get everyone’s attention on a trail she wanted to follow, with or without the group which she believed may lead to the other Bones. Jon, one of the group then encounters a note Thorn had written to Fone Bone and discovered it wasn’t in the place she left it, Lucius most likely having put it in the known spot for trading messages, the group, other than Thorn and Phoney deciding to check Gran’ma Ben’s farm in the morning. The two then go off in search of Fone, but the men in the group notice hooded figures, the Stick-Eaters heading towards them. When Thorn acknowledges them, one confides a message from her grandmother and where she wished Thorn to meet her, Thorn than asks what they know of Fone and they recount the latest news as to his whereabouts, she still struggling with what to do first, deciding she’ll make her final decision in the morning. We then see a dream Thorn has which shows her looking like Snow White and speaking to her younger looking grandmother who urges her to cut the vines around her, younger Lucius advises her to disobey, another young grandmother coming from behind Thorn, but not being able to see her. The younger “evil” grandmother tries to take Thorn’s sword and Thorn wakens clutching Fone’s spiked club, she walking off into the darkness.

The four left in Thorn’s group, being deserted by her during the night, end up walking in the dark trying to uncover Old Man’s Cave. The biggest in their group is still steaming about Phoney’s trouble-making ways and is about to take it out on him again when Wendell tries to hold him back, enforcing Thorn’s order to leave him alone. Gran’ma Ben soon shows up and enquires where Thorn is, stopping the two from fighting amongst themselves. They escort them back to the cave, Lucius going after Thorn. We then see where Fone and Smiley have gotten to, they soon finding themselves amongst rat creatures and when they begin threatening them with death, Thorn comes out to defend them, but upon seeing the club she brandished and giving to Fone, they truly show fear and run off for believing they were the ones to kill Kingdok. After greeting each other warmly, Thorn then figures out which direction will take them to Old Man’s Cave, then promptly heads in the opposite direction, believing they can’t be helped by anyone there, looking for shelter instead. We then see the Hooded One speaking with the Lord of the Locusts who was concerned with his interest in the one who bears the star, the Lord of the Locusts making it clear if the Hooded One’s idea failed, he’d pay for it.

We then see the Bones and Thorn spitting cherry pits at each other in the tree hollow and they getting so loud as to bring Ted back to inform them to keep it down for having to try and keep them hidden. Thorn then shares their plans to confront and over-power the Hooded One, Ted then voicing his opinion they should be going to Old Man’s Cave. Thorn still denying this to be a suitable plan and the three discussing what more is known of the Hooded One and where the Lord of the Locusts came from. Thorn then confides why the Lord of the Locusts was showing such interest in herself and Phoney and how it will aid his release from bondage, going on to confess why she doesn’t trust Gran’ma Ben at the moment and it having to do with the knowledge of a nursemaid Thorn had come to realize didn’t exist. We then see Roque Ja confronting whomever is in his presence, it turning out to be the Hooded One asking for a favor, Roque Ja turning him down before he can continue, taunting him with how he probably wouldn’t have been able to get the information from Kingdok who is now lacking an important appendage needed to speak, he coming out from the darkness as well and the Hooded One having to hold him back.

The Hooded One goes on to mention needing Roque Ja’s help in capturing the Bones once more and what state he wished the princess to be in, he accepting once he gets an agreed upon reward for his efforts. Then we see Phoney being wakened by Jon, he revealing how long Phoney’s been asleep since he’d been ill and now they all residing in Old Man’s Cave. Jon explains some of the cave’s history and Gran’ma Ben comes to see Phoney as well, he realizing her status and thinking he’s going to pay for his bad behavior, she agreeing to judge him lightly. Gran’ma Ben then takes Phoney to a part of the cave which shows drawings on the walls implying the beginning which started with a dragon queen and how the Lord of the Locusts became involved, including an ancestor of Gran’ma Ben’s and in extension, Thorn. Phoney then learns what role the rat creatures believed he would be playing in all of this, Lucius interrupting by coming to update how he hadn’t found Thorn due to her excellent training from the dragons and how they were getting boxed in by the Hooded One and rat creatures setting up camps around them. Gran’ma Ben then defends Phoney from getting decked by Lucius since he was only worried about the well-being of his cousins and when Lucius departs, he asks Gran’ma Ben who the Hooded One was, she not knowing either, but being able to clarify what would occur if he succeeded in releasing the Lord of the Locusts, the outcome not a good one.

Fone and Smiley meanwhile, are gathering water at the barn to prepare for a bath whilst Thorn was within, looking through her grandmother’s belongings. They continue to discuss what the next item of business will be for their group, they not knowing and figuring Thorn would be the leader. Thorn meanwhile is hearing their conversation and interjects what her plan is and reveals why she hadn’t told them until then. Fone puts in his two cents and Thorn expands on why she doesn’t want to go to Old Man’s Cave, but then Fone with Smiley’s help, convinces her it’s the best idea for now and they head in the same direction instead. Lucius is then shone giving command to the group following him in order to keep the rat creatures from completely surrounding Old Man’s Cave. Lucius then sees a woman who introduces herself as Briar and we learn who she’s related to, he in denial it could be her and Jonathan overseeing their conversation from within the woods, also noticing rat creatures approaching. Jonathan then shouts of their closing in and Lucius breaks away from Briar to help defend the cave. We skip to where Gran’ma Ben is updated on what was happening outside the cave, the scout not learning much and then continuing conversation with Phoney in relation to his soul and as she’s explaining she again gets the “gitchy” feeling and Phoney feels a rumbling around them. When they get outdoors they see the place where the Lord of the Locusts is trapped has a dust cloud rising up around it and then Gran’ma Ben learns of what’s happened to Lucius, he coming to inform what had happened to them, she hoping Thorn is alright. Then Roque Ja comes out from behind Gran’ma Ben’s farmhouse sniffing around and seemingly stalking Thorn and co.

Lucius reports back to Gran’ma Ben of who he’d seen as the Hooded One to which she has trouble believing for the one mentioned was thought to be dead, after only seeming to feel pity for her. Gran’ma Ben goes on to share no one else coming to help them and they would most likely be fighting among their own, alone. Wendell then walks up demanding for Phoney to be given to them since he’s the one the rat creatures are looking for and being in this mess because of him. Gran’ma Ben tries to appeal to Wendell and those with him they shouldn’t hand over the one thing they were after if they believed it would help release the Lord of the Locusts, but whilst they were being held off, Phoney takes off and so Gran’ma Ben spreads everyone out looking for him so he doesn’t get caught by the enemies and lose the war inadvertently because of his absence, she going off in search of him on her own and being seen by Roque Ja. Gran’ma Ben notices Phoney and stops him before he made matters worse, Lucius coming up behind the two and Roque Ja looking ready to act, Lucius warning her and Roque Ja pouncing, getting Gran’ma Ben, Lucius jumping on him and the three falling off the cliff. Gran’ma Ben starts by punching the lion though, showing her strength isn’t only rumors, Phoney continuing his ditching of them.

Roque Ja ignores them after and mentions his targets being Phoney and “the princess”, we then seeing Phoney run straight into Fone, Thorn and Smiley walking close behind. Phoney explain how he’d been to Old Man’s Cave and it not being safe anymore and then of Gran’ma Ben’s run in with Roque Ja, which makes Thorn want to go and defend her, Phoney and Fone trying to stop her, but not getting far since Roque Ja had followed Phoney and swatted Thorn out of the way. Fone gets swatted down some boulders and Roque Ja picks up Thorn and Phoney to finish his mission, Smiley trying to get Fone to wake up, but he’s gone into his dreams and sees the Red Dragon there stating for him to wake up and of Thorn’s condition, needing him to follow her. After the Red Dragon conveys how he won’t be able to go with him, Fone wakes and Smiley tells him which direction they’d gone, the two running after Roque Ja.

We then see Gran’ma Ben tending to Lucius who had been hurt, but advising her to make haste for Roque Ja so she can try and divert the lion from succeeding in catching Thorn or Phoney, he assuring her he’ll be going back to Old Man’s Cave and so Gran’ma Ben follows their trail. Smiley and Fone are then shown running over some rocks to where they witness Kingdok, some rat creatures and the Hooded One, Phoney having been bound on a flat stone, the Hooded One remarking how he may have evaded them for some time, but he was caught now and his mystic powers must not be as strong as he thought, Phoney denying knowing anything about this and admitting it was a big misunderstanding and refusing to take part in the Hooded One’s ritual to release the Lord of the Locusts, but she warning Phoney if he didn’t help her willingly she’d accept him as a sacrifice, Bone trying to reason with her, but the Hooded One then showing how the foretelling of Phoney’s coming had been known, an obvious sign, appearing through the thick smoke behind her.

Phoney then realizes what they’d seen and how Fone would definitely be mad if he knew, Fone and Smiley putting two and two together and the balloon shaped like one of the Bones being the cause of them being run out of Boneville. Gran’ma Ben then tries to stop the Hooded One from continuing the sacrifice, after Bone had tried to explain what the balloon had been for and the message beneath, it having a banner at the bottom which was ripped, partially. Gran’ma Ben then speaks of the mistake the Hooded One had made and how the balloon wasn’t the one needed to free the Lord of Locusts but Thorn, who the Hooded One said was dead. Kingdok then goes on to berate how the Hooded One had disgraced his people with the mistake made and then we see what happens to the Hooded One due to the incompetence allowed to play out. Fone goes to Thorn and gives her the necklace the dragon had given him whilst he’d been unconscious, meanwhile locusts having covered her, but when he gives her the necklace, she awakens and Gran’ma Ben and the Bones all try to make sure she can walk so they can escape the area due to it’s instability. Thorn stops only for a moment to put up her hood, giving the impression they haven’t quite saved her yet and this volume ending. I won’t like pausing in the story, but there’s a side-story to be read: Rose, but this volume and the whole series so far is definitely worth the effort.