The Silver Linings Playbook

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Pat jumps right in with being visited by his mother and knowing summer had hit by the color of her painted toenails. She meets him outside whilst he was doing some exercising, explaining his reasons for doing so involving Nikki’s preferences, when his mother inquired. She then throws him for a loop when asking if he’d like to go home with her, he surprised by her truthful tone, but only if he didn’t go after Nikki, she and his father agreeing to job-hunt for him and ready him for his own place. Pat continues his push-ups, whilst she attempted to convince him to accept. Pat weighs his options, not wanting to deal with the downer institution he was in anymore, and agreeing to her terms until Nikki and his “apart time” was over. Pat packs his bag and sort of says goodbye to his roomie. When he meets his mother and doctor in the lobby, the doctor seems crestfallen when Pat mentions how much better he’ll feel when Nikki calls off their separation, Pat seeing this as the doctor’s inability to believe in positivity and optimism. When they’re driving, his mother shares of the process she’d gone through for him, and he states his gratefulness of all she’d done to get him out, and confirms his want to heal himself. They reach New Jersey, Pat’s hometown, the changes to the area making him breathe hard, his mother assuring his new therapist would be able to help him get over his anxiety.

When they get home, Pat is greeted by his new workout weights which he thanks his mother profusely for, and immediately puts to use, he mentioning how besides this, he wrote daily activities (of which this book is one) for Nikki’s perusal when she decided to speak to him again. The writing having started because of the drugs given to him whilst being institutionalized affecting his memory, this being his way of knowing what would be favored to share with Nikki, the doctors not returning his first entries, so he starting fresh. His mother then confesses of their house having been burgled and the pictures with he and Nikki having been taken due to the expensive frames they were in, Pat going along with this explanation (leaving me uncertain as to whether he truly believed this). Pat and his father don’t speak for awhile, he needing to accustom himself to Pat living with them, his visit during Pat’s sabbatical only ascertaining his father’s rage at his son’s situation. Pat also began reading literature for Nikki since she had English teacher friends, he beginning with The Great Gatsby. Pat’s firm belief in silver linings colors his irritated reaction with the book, Fitzgerald obviously not the bright-side kind, he instead focusing on being able to impress Nikki with reading her favorite book, and eventually planning on reading her American Literature syllabus, waiting for his moment to burst out a line from Gatsby which also applied to him when Nikki, her friends, and he had another dinner together.

During another workout, Pat’s mother informs him of his appointment with Dr. Patel, which he attempts to postpone until the evening, but is told of the times agreed being court-ordered, so he prepares to go. As he’s waiting to see Patel, a song comes on which agitates him into believing it had been played to set him off, his tantrum bringing out Patel, whom has the secretary shut off the music, as requested, Pat breaking down. Patel has Pat follow him into his office as his mother and the secretary attend to the mess he’d made of the furniture and magazines, Pat immediately warming to the pleasant, but oddly painted and adorned office. Patel offers Pat a recliner and request he call him Cliff, so as to keep sessions light. When Patel asks about his reaction to the song, Pat shows his resistance in answering by humming one note and blocking the memory, Patel moving on to ask about Nikki, Pat realizing his responding question sounded too sensitively protective of the topic, but Patel explaining his motives being to get to know Pat better, and since his goal was to see Nikki again, it being an ideal spot to begin.

Pat opens up about their temporary separation and the reasons she’d given, he also explaining his dedication to his job having over-shadowed his home life and neglecting her, Patel inquiring after how long the separation would last and Pat being told to not make contact with her until further notice which made the estrangement’s length uncertain. Pat then delves further on his reasons he believed she’d return, having to do with happy endings, and life being like a series of films, so his happy ending should be coming up soon. Also, he having sworn off watching movies to dedicate living his own movie until Nikki returned. Patel’s response is what convinces Pat he would get along well with this doctor, he not condemning his optimism. They move on to varying topics after, Pat asking about Patel’s family as a courtesy, and the subject turning to valuing the women in their lives whilst they were there, Patel informing Pat he was changing his medication and to share any issues he had going forward. On the ride home, when Pat mentions his idea of the likelihood Nikki would locate him more easily at his parents’ home rather than the institution, which again prompted him to voice how grateful he was, his mother breaks down, and when they get home, Pat continues his workout. When he prepares for sleep, he thinks of his disappointment of his father still avoiding him, and then of Nikki, in lieu of reading, since his mother hadn’t gone to the library yet, but looked forward to his expected dreams of Nikki.

Pat reiterates his unfailing faith in silver linings, he beginning his run, which tended to happen at sunset to see if there were clouds in the sky to cover the sun, so he could view the actual silver lining which reinforced his hope of seeing Nikki again. Pat had lost so much weight, he was close to the amount he was in high school, this also being the time Nikki first met him, he hoping the change back would aid Nikki’s ease for believing he’d changed for the better. What fuels Pat’s run is imagining he’s jogging to Nikki, helping the notion the amount of time left apart is also decreasing.

Pat’s request for a book when his mother is going to the library was a romance story by Hemingway, so he could learn from it for Nikki, and when she returns with A Farewell to Arms, he enjoys it until getting to the depressing ending (I swear, Quick better not be ruining books I plan on reading), he unable to comprehend why she’d teach this to high schoolers. Pat is now angered with Nikki, vowing to not read Hemingway ever again, and isn’t surprised by his suicide.

When Pat’s next at Patel’s office, the secretary shuts the stereo off when seeing he’s entered, and when seeing Patel, shares how his medication is treating him. Pat hadn’t been taking them regularly, so not actually noticing anything. Patel then makes certain Pat hasn’t had any odd visions and has him promise to report to his mother if he does see anything strange. Pat is certain the combination won’t affect him so drastically due to having good command of his perception.

Later, during a break between sets, he smells crab snacks his mother is cooking, as well as pizza and buffalo wings. He asks why she’d done so, noting this usually meant guests were expected, he then thinking of how Nikki would devour crab snacks and usually he’d react invalidation when she spoke of her guilt of having stuffed herself, Pat now deciding he would do the opposite and state how it would be fine, since she needed more flesh on her bones. His mother instead informs of his brother, Jake coming to watch football with he and their father, Pat stressing a bit since Jake had reacted similarly to how his father had, saying some terrible insults about Nikki. Pat returns to the basement to do another set of push-ups and takes his jog early due to the family get-together.

Ronnie, Pat’s old best friend, recognizes him whilst he’s out, but Pat doesn’t stop due to his tight schedule, Ronnie not ever having visited him whilst he’d been with Nikki, only sending letters about his daughter during his stay in the hospital. When getting back, he sees Jake’s car, he seeming to be doing okay in the money department (I’m getting a bit tired of hearing Danny’s ghetto-like phrases interspersed in Pat’s thoughts), going in for a shower, and after changing, heading in the direction of conversation, Jake surprised by Pat’s physical change, he not pulling away when Jake checks his muscular arm, still a bit pissed about Jake’s comments about Nikki, struggling with also feeling glad to see him. Pat sort of gives Jake a response of forgiveness, which Jake looks impressed by, and seems to Pat, nearly emotionally overwhelmed, but instead gives Pat a gift of an Eagle’s jersey, Jake explaining whom the number belonged and spoke of a stadium Pat hadn’t heard of before in regards to whether he planned on continuing attending games with him and another dude, Scott. Pat also learns Jake plans on spotting him for the tickets since he’d relinquished all finances to Nikki.

Their father doesn’t appear until right before the start of the game, not acknowledging Pat at all, their mother suggesting he attempt some kind of interaction when they were both in the kitchen. Conversation is clipped, but Pat is focused on noticing most of the players he’d rooted for were gone and the Vet stadium they used to go to had been torn down, he disbelieving this the most, even after being shown footage, and when speaking with his mother in the kitchen to suggest the possibility of what he’d seen being in his head, she reluctantly shares what year it was, Pat unable to cope with this and shrieking his disbelief, and then demanding to know how long he’d been away, Jake supplying it had been almost four years, Pat still unable to grasp this and then fainting.

Pat mentions how he’d had the misconception of Kenny G being solely heard in the hospital, he currently readying to sleep in the boiling attic so he could lose more weight, but this night bringing the auditory hallucination of Kenny G, which then manifests to visual. Pat has an irrational fear of the man, hearing a song start and as he’s begging for Kenny G to desist, his yells get louder and he begins banging his hand on his head, his parents now attempting to keep his arms down, which unfortunately brings the fall of his mother. His father kicks him, ending the music, but the punch to the face, bringing him to tears, his father deciding Pat would be put back in the institution, his mother staying to comfort him as he drifted to sleep. He awakes with her still with him, he apologizing profusely and begging to be allowed to stay, his mother reassuring him of he not going anywhere and then making him breakfast, he then getting straight to working out after, due to sleeping late.

Ronnie ends up appearing in the basement, Pat finishing a set of bench presses, and reading into Ronnie’s excuse of not being able to stay long because his wife didn’t know. Pat doesn’t confide the truth when Ronnie takes notice of his facial bruises, but accepts when Ronnie offers to return to workout with him sometime, Pat not holding his breath. Then when Ronnie invites him to dinner the next night, Pat is surprised by his specifying a time frame. Ronnie had figured Pat thought his wife, Veronica didn’t like him, whilst Nikki had despised Veronica, and Pat seemed to adopt her negative view of his best friend and wife.

Pat is over-thinking what he would wear since Veronica was obsessive-compulsive about her fancy dress parties, his mother letting him know to get ready to see Patel. When Pat confesses his anxiety about seeing Veronica and noting Nikki’s opinion of she not being a nice person, Patel then suggests he wear his jersey and new khakis, Pat reassured. When Patel mentions the Kenny G incident, Pat blocks out the name. Patel then brings up how he hadn’t been treating his mother well, and Pat feeling terribly, he breaking down, and agreeing to want to be a better person. Patel then relates to changing his prescription for higher doses to stave his outbursts, which if isn’t remedied, Pat would need to be readmitted, Pat declaring he’d be better.

Once Pat gets ready, his mother confirms he looked fine, but wondered why he couldn’t wear one of his new shirts, Pat sharing how Patel had encouraged he wear his jersey, she then giving him a bouquet and wine to give Veronica and Ronnie. When he arrives, Ronnie is impressed with his jersey, they meet Veronica and Emily, their little girl, in the kitchen, Veronica noticing, but not mentioning his bruise, and greeting him warmly. When Pat officially meets Emily, he understands her cuteness factor, and Ronnie gets him a beer, Pat inquiring whom else was coming, Ronnie revealing Veronica’s sister, Tiffany was the fourth guest, Pat surprised to learn her husband had died, she then coming in before he could learn how. When Tiffany and he waited in the living room whilst Ronnie put Emily to bed and Veronica finished dinner, Tiffany asks about what happened to his face in reply to his compliment of she looking nice, he thinking the makeup was too much, but wanting to practice for Nikki.

Tiffany eventually leaves him alone once he asks about her job and why she’d lost it, he awaiting Ronnie. Dinner is immaculate, but weird due to only Ronnie and Veronica making conversation, they focusing on Tiffany and Pat, one complementing either of them on their accomplishments and pastimes. When dessert is barely finished, Tiffany declares of being weary and asks backwardly if Pat would walk her home, Pat taking the opportunity of practicing his kindness skills. When they reach her parents home, she states of living in a guest house and stating how he could sleep with her if he wanted, she breaking down when he doesn’t answer, Pat surprised into silence. When she hugs him, he’s thinking about how she’s crying makeup onto his shirt, but then begins getting teary himself, eventually the two parting, and when Pat gets home, is told to phone Ronnie, instead he laying down until sunrise.

Pat has a single picture of Nikki, a head-shot he didn’t get to tell her he liked, and had been a birthday present. Pat then remembers his wedding video, and goes to his parents’ room to ask after it, but when his mother doesn’t answer, he announces knowing where they keep them and is off to look, but when he doesn’t locate it, and sees his mother standing behind him, she tries to play off it having gotten lost, Pat losing his temper, but reigning himself in to leave the room and do a bunch of sit-ups, push-ups, and stationary biking, he then going to sleep in the attic, doing his hum-counting due to his uncertainty of Kenny G possibly returning, but makes it through the night in peace.

Pat was now reading The Scarlet Letter and relating how he’d called Hester’s baby daddy by the eighth chapter, he wondering if Nikki played up the risque bits to the class she taught. Pat continues his thoughts on the story and idea of which sin would be greater in God’s eyes: the coveting of another man’s wife or leaving Pearl fatherless. He finds he could sympathize with Chillingworth at first, but gave up when the man continued to mess with Dimmesdale. Instead, Pat shined to Hester’s character overall, due to her outlook on silver linings, and again finds similarities to her story and Patel’s advice to treating women well. Before the moment passes, he considers whether if he’d understood this sooner whether it would’ve changed the outcome of his relationship apart or whether it was one of those lessons which must be learned firsthand. He then hopes for the chance to publicly apologize to Nikki and show her his knowledge of the Old English classic.

When Pat next speaks with Patel, he senses his mother had spoken with him of the dinner party by the way he’d inquired about it, Pat not sweating he knew something about the dinner and instead glad to report of the shirt he’d suggested working well, Patel changes the topic to Tiffany, though and asks whether he’d slept with her after Pat divulged believing she was a slut, Pat irked by Patel’s question at first, until realizing he was only gauging his loyalty to his wife. Then Patel gives insight as to why Tiffany had offered to sleep with him being about obtaining a friend rather than sluttiness, he having Pat go over how the night had ended, Patel stating how kind Pat had been to her, which gets his happy agreement, but has also led to her trailing him on his jogs, even after he told her to stop. Patel asks whether Pat thought Tiffany was sexy and Pat agrees, but states of this not mattering since he was taken, Patel then questioning whether Pat truly believed he hadn’t seen Nikki for only a few months, Pat becoming angry, but apologizing, Patel allowing he should’ve taken Pat’s answer seriously. He then gives an example of going out to do something he didn’t care for with his wife and to possibly allow Tiffany to run with him, date her a few times and perhaps after a little while, she’ll get bored of him, Pat at first dubious, but taking Patel’s word for it.

Pat inquires after his mother’s thoughts on whether dating Tiffany will get her to leave, she posing the idea of he needing all the buddies he could get, which he doesn’t respond to since she seemed to hope he’d take a shine to her, this making him uncomfortable. She was also the single member in his family whom didn’t loathe Nikki, she having remarked to Pat of noticing his “friend” tagging along on his run on days she watched after him, giving her own version of a wink-wink. Later, Pat psyches himself up to ask Tiffany out, but instead only starts his run, with her trailing him. When he gets to a diner, he asks her out, and they make plans to meet there later, Tiffany finally biffing off, to Pat’s surprise, he then running longer and getting the good sign of multiple clouds lined with brightness. When he returns, he informing his mother of his plans, she suppressing her pleasure, and when he’s ready to go, she advises him to wear a belt and tuck his shirt in, which seemed pointless to him with this only being a way to end Tiffany’s attachment, but he reminds himself of being in his mother’s debt, and does as she asks, she then having him put on some casual shoes she’d gotten him.

When Pat meets Tiffany outside her parents’ home, he complements her outfit, she regarding his shoes as she walks off; the two walk in silence for a half hour. After they sit and order drinks of water and tea, Pat is so busy stressing over how much money he’d have so he’d be able to over-tip like Nikki had taught him, he misses Tiffany’s order, and when asked for his own, gets raisin bran, learning Tiffany had only gotten the tea after the waitress left. When the cereal arrives, Pat offers to share, Tiffany taking him up on it, and when they finish, he gives the waitress the forty dollars, the waitress shocked and happy. When the two reach Tiffany’s home, she shares how she didn’t actually want Pat to sleep with her, she walking away. His mother doesn’t believe all he’d had was cereal, but instead of he entertaining this chat further, he goes to his room. He speaks to his picture of Nikki about his night out and hoping they had the chance to do the things he’d done with Tiffany, he crying and muffling the noise with his pillow.

On the day of a game, Pat wakes early to begin his workout, and when he runs, he’s surprised to see Tiffany, since he was doing so in the morning. She refrains from speaking with him and only follows his route, and when he finishes, she jogs home, Pat showering and discovering Ronnie sitting with Jake, everyone taking up the Eagles chant when Pat starts by stating, “Go Birds!”, Jake instigating a singalong of their team’s fight song, afterwards Pat feeling like he was truly at home. When he notices Jake’s new jersey and player, he’s confused by his turnaround, Pat then focusing on being a good cheerleader for the Birds to satisfy his father, he feeling happy being with him, but still holding a grudge for his punching and kicking him. Their father at first is pissed off with the results of the playing, but by halftime is satisfied with the Birds progress, they all throwing around the footyball, and before going back to watch the game, do the chant with their neighbors once more.

When the Eagles win the game, Jake urges their father to join their fight song again, their father surprising Pat by putting his arm around his shoulder, for being so drunkenly happy, his mother tearfully enjoying the scene from the kitchen, and Ronnie having Pat walk him home. As they stop in the park to toss the football around, Ronnie asks about his thoughts on Tiffany, Pat being honest, not regarding her as anything, and Ronnie stating of her weirdness, Pat giving him a bit of a hard time when he states of Tiffany being in therapy, and then he relating Tiffany’s lack of spouse being somehow similar to Pat’s situation, Pat letting this slide. Ronnie then says his peace about what had been reported about Tiffany’s release from her job, Pat deducing this must’ve been the reason he’d been allowed to come to watch the game in the first place, Pat taking offense by the thought they would believe he’d take advantage of Tiffany and believed they didn’t truly relate to her perspective about the situation, so Pat goes to Tiffany’s, and when getting permission to knock on her door from her mother, whom seems shocked by Pat’s reply of being married and only wanting to be her friend after she asks what he wanted with her, but walks away from her door when she doesn’t answer, she turning up when he gets to the park, and finally reveals why she followed him during his jogs. Her answer brings up more questions which she doesn’t plan on sharing until her exploratory survey was complete, they not chatting with each other as Pat follows her until she walks him home, she inquiring after his team winning and then leaving him there.

An interesting occurrence happens on Monday when Pat’s father comes down to the basement whilst he’s working out for the first time. His father relates of having decided to leave his sports papers for him after he’s read them from now on, so Pat could catch up in learning the new players, which surprises him due to how his father normally brought his papers to work with him. When Pat finishes his set and goes up to breakfast, he asks his mother about his father’s odd gift, he debating whether he was going to take all of his pills as she answers, she advising he not think too much about it, and his father only attempting to make an effort, Pat then decides he’ll take all of his required amount of pills. During the week, Pat reads up on the team, but has yet been able to show off his newly acquired knowledge to his father, since he stayed secluded, which he discusses with Patel on his Friday session, but Patel consistently refocusing on Tiffany, which irritates Pat. Patel then inquires about he, Tiffany, and Ronnie’s family going to the beach and asking what Pat thought Tiffany may wear for her swimsuit. Pat’s anger flares until thinking this could be another test, his response being to remind Patel of he not being single. They finish with referencing the Eagles, which has Pat deciding his doctor was the best ever, and on the ride home, his mother agrees with Pat’s idea of his father likely deciding he’d begin speaking to him again if their team won.

Pat is fully supplied with beach accessories when Ronnie picks him up, his mom having packed him an extra outfit, as well as the normal beach accouterments, and despite his not needing any snacks, had made a lunch, regardless of his words being heeded about Ronnie bringing subs; Pat’s contribution to his baggage being a football. When he’d gotten in, Veronica decides to give thanks to Pat’s mom for the gifts he’d brought over the night of the dinner, she having come out to wave goodbye to Pat, this greeting though, giving her a reason to approach the van and launching in with a question about what they thought of the outfit she’d bought for Pat, also taking the opportunity to attempt a closer look at Tiffany, whom turns away from her. When Pat’s mom tries to greet Tiffany and is ignored, Veronica and Ronnie show off Emily to lighten the awkwardness. After a few moments, Tiffany comments on how she thought their plans were to hit the beach, which gets them on their way, Veronica and Ronnie attempting to keep the chatter going until Tiffany suggests silence. They get to a secluded part of the beach and as Veronica fusses with the blanket and Ronnie sets the umbrella, Emily gets sand in her eyes and screams, Tiffany requesting Veronica to shut her up, in so many words, for feeling unable to cope with the noise, which prompts Veronica to advise her in remembering what her therapist suggested, making Tiffany cuss at her and walking off, since she’d said this in front of Pat.

Veronica goes after her and apologizes as they walk, Ronnie and Pat fixing the blanket, the ladies not returning after ten minutes passed. The two eventually take Emily down to the water, and in for a little while, they then doze, Pat wakes first and entertains Emily for a bit, he then taking her out into the water again, but the waves having become much bigger, Pat swimming them over and making Emily giggle which has Pat decide on his resolve to “make a daughter” when Nikki returned, he then hearing Veronica shrieking his name from the shore, so he paddles them in, she upsetting Emily and demanding to know why he’d taken her out, then turning on Ronnie for having allowed this, Ronnie then seeming to think Pat must’ve done something terrible in the process, so due to these stressful circumstances, Pat feels an outburst under the surface, dashing off, upset, and then noticing Tiffany streak past him. They race for awhile, and when they get closer to their umbrella again, Pat follows as she goes into the much calmer ocean, they getting closer to each other for a moment, and Pat being reminded of Nikki, glad Tiffany swims further away for feeling the urge to kiss her. After they float in the ocean for a bit, Tiffany states to Veronica and Ronnie of they being ready to leave, Ronnie and Veronica all smiles now, and making sure they wanted to go before having lunch. Pat agrees with Tiffany, and the group pack up and return home (odd reactions from Veronica and Ronnie, but everyone has their own way of letting go of hysteria).

Pat’s father wakes him with the terrifying screaming start of the Eagles chant, they finishing it, and without another word, he leaving. Pat now has two hours to workout before his brother’s tailgate party, Tiffany meeting him at 8 a.m. for a run, his dad giving him a ride after, he not attending the game due to a bad history with an opposing fan and his resulting assault charge. His father fills the ride with Eagles talk and for Pat to be there for his brother and mom, he then leaving him a little ways from the stadium, ending with the chant once more, a few more fans joining in with them. Pat walks his way through the friendly crowd until seeing Jake, he greeting him buddy-buddy style, Scott doing the same, and letting slip how they hadn’t seen each other in years, backtracking by asking how many months it’d been, and then deciding to introduce him to the boys inside the tent.

Afterward, Scott talks about his family instead of asking Pat about what was new with him, which comforted him, but also again being confronted with the reality of it being a few years since he’d last seen him, and after food and beers, tosses the ball around until Jake notices a Giants fan and starts an “asshole” chant, fifty fans joining in, and when they make the kid with him cry, he goes after Pat once people were dispersing. Scott and Jake defend him and the crowd returns, Jake getting knocked down. Pat goes off on the guy and knocks him out, he fleeing, distressed, and puking a couple times until Jake catches up and calls Scott, whom informs Pat of the guy being fine, but looking for him, so to stay away. Jake leads Pat to the stadium, and when getting to their seats, is impressed with the spot, but the Eagles don’t win this game, Jake and Pat parting near Jake’s apartment, Jake giving him a hug before leaving him, then getting on the subway again, still plagued with thoughts of the little boy crying. When he gets home, his mother tells him of the news of his father having broken the TV, he then going downstairs for a bit of a workout. He has a terrible dream involving Nikki and the memory of the Giants fan, but when waking and seeing the sports pages at the stairs, tries to let it go and prepare to workout again.

Pat and Tiffany go back to the same diner for the same order with tea, the two not having spoken on their walk or as they waited, Pat noting how their friendship didn’t rely on much chat, but he debating whether to confide his obsessive thinking of the crying little boy, since he didn’t see Patel until Friday, and she may relate to his feelings, he deciding to share, even though upon starting, regretting it, and when he begins to digress about how Nikki wouldn’t have approved his conduct, Tiffany dismisses her, and repeatedly says, essentially, she could fuck off, since she wasn’t around anyways, and she must not care for Pat much due to this. She leaves when the server comes to tell her she couldn’t cuss and when Pat goes looking for her, he sees her running off, she not answering him when asked if everything was alright, she going home without saying a word.

Pat attempts reading The Bell Jar in the evening, Nikki’s opinion being all females should be made to read it, he wanting to read it so he could understand the female perspective better and Nikki’s view. It doesn’t take him long to sense it was going to be a bleak story, he revealing his profession as a history teacher helping him realize this by the Narrator mentioning dark points in history, he describing the plot. Pat hadn’t reached the end when he states how he was curious of what the main character would do in order to rise from her mental illness in one piece, but this also spurring his interest due to his want in learning more about mental health. He relates how the Narrator almost dies from losing a lot of blood and how similar to a female character in A Farewell to Arms had suffered the same, making him question why this was popular in American Literature. By the end, Pat gets aggravated by its lack of finalizing and staying open to the Narrator’s fate, but upon reading the short biography in the book of how it was based on Plath’s life, and how she ended hers, he destroys the book, which was borrowed from the library, and proceeds to workout, wondering why people read such books. Tiffany continues to come by for runs over the next couple days, the two still not conversing.

When Pat sees Patel, he has no intention of sharing his bad acts during the week, but spills for guilt, not noticing how upset he’d become until finishing his speech. Patel’s response isn’t what Pat expects since he doesn’t tear him down for being violent toward the Giants fan, and attempts to ignore his statement of the Eagles making it to the Super Bowl two years ago. Patel then explains when he isn’t in his chair, he’s a fellow fan, but when he’s sitting, he’s his therapist, Patel reclining and stating Pat’s actions not having been the correct course of action, inquiring how else he could’ve reacted. Patel suggests Pat trying to use his Kenny G hum, asking where he’d come up with it, Pat almost annoyed Patel had brought him up, until remembering how kindly he’d taken his misstep, sharing how he’d gotten it from Nikki. Patel then asks why he didn’t use it for his moments of rage, Pat not having considered the possibility before. They move on to why Tiffany had reacted as she had, and Plath’s novel, Patel’s daughter also having recently been required to read it, and going on to explain its usefulness as a teaching tool to cope with reality and showed how some people’s minds worked. Patel ends their session by assuring he wasn’t angered by Pat’s fight, and they doing the Eagles chant, Pat knowing Patel was doing it to help him let go of his guilt, and it doing its job.

Pat’s in the basement working out when he hears his father instructing where to place the delivery of his new T.V., his mother coming in half an hour later to argue how they couldn’t afford it, but his father shouting of if they could spend so much on Pat, he could buy himself a new set, his mother leaving for her bedroom, Pat knowing she was upset, and he being the cause. He feels terrible about this, but upon seeing the T.V., is quite excited to watch a game on it. Pat’s father ignores his test question of purchasing the new set, Pat knowing he wouldn’t speak to anyone after fighting with his mother, he going on his run with Tiffany, whom also stays quiet throughout, and when he returns, he sees his mother’s car missing from the driveway.

Pat’s mother is still gone by the time Pat’s sleeping pills were supposed to be administered, he getting nervous by this uncustomary tardiness. After waking his father with his concerns and getting no response, he then locates his medication and takes the one’s he recognized for the hour, wanting to impress his mother by being responsible. He lays down, but is plagued with persistent questions until hearing a car pull up, meeting his mother on the porch, and realizing she’s wasted when informing Pat of Nikki’s mistake in letting him go, as well as her booze-breath, he leading her to the couch where she goes to sleep quickly. Pat moves her to his bed, then retrieves water and Tylenol, waking her briefly to have her take them, he then obsessed with thoughts of partially being the cause of his mother’s drunkenness. He goes to the attic to sleep, but is wakened by Kenny G above him, whom isn’t deterred by his humming, he keeping at it, and finally, Mr. G disappears, he searching the room to make certain, about to be proud of himself when he registers a box with his name on it and becomes uneasy. He takes a look inside, and first removes his high school soccer jacket, he then arranging the attic as it had been before he’d moved boxes around, he going back to his sleeping bag, but returning to the box throughout the night with disbelief of what he’d discovered, it reconfirming his mother’s dishonesty.

When Pat wakes in the morning and checks on his still sleeping mother, he has conflicting feelings of pride for having left the now empty glass next to his mother and peeved by her actions regarding the box in the attic. He goes downstairs and witnesses his father burning a steak, Pat leaving him to it for his morning workout, he hearing the smoke alarm for fifteen minutes, and when it’s the usual time for his pills, gets them himself, checking on his mother with considerable concern, but once again being ignored by his father when he attempts to start a conversation. He continues his workout, his mother ending his anxiety once she comes down to regard his successful pill taking, he giving minimal acknowledgement and asking where she’d gone, she instead speaking of her appreciation he’d taken care of her, and once she mentions how life would be changing for the better for them all due to a conversation she and his father had whilst he’d been out, his concentration about the box is lost. She then informs him of leaving for the day, but would be back, Pat trusting her because of her steady gaze.

When Pat goes upstairs and is again ignored by his father, he takes his run, this time alone, and for once had hoped Tiffany would turn up, he thinking she had become his new best buddy, which unnerved him. When he gets back home, his hope of seeing Jake’s car in the drive is dashed, he sensing he’d be stuck with his father alone. After he gets ready to watch the game, and during the first commercial break, he starts the yell for the Eagles chant, but stops when his father doesn’t join him. As the game progresses though, his father’s attitude changes for the better, he ordering pizza for them, giving Pat a beer, and talking of Baskett keeping up the good work. When the pizza arrives and his father mentions this day being better if Jake were present, Pat inquires where he was, but doesn’t get a reply. Fortunately, the Eagles win, but his father doesn’t stick around to chat, Pat then taking the opportunity to clean up. He detects a balled up piece of paper under the coffee table, and when inspecting it, sees his mother’s writing.

After reading the letter written to his father, he thinks of how nice it would be to have his father sit with them for meals, as his mother had transcribed. Pat locates Jake’s number, it being picked up by a lovely voiced woman. Jake comes on the line talking about the game, Pat inquiring why he hadn’t come and learning about their mother instructing him not to, Pat then reading the letter he’d found and Jake giving her kudos, he confirming they’d get together Monday. Whilst Pat waited for his mother to return, he finishes cleaning up, she asking if his father had commanded he do so when she comes in to see him scrubbing the couch, she informing Pat how they’d be leaving his trash from now on, Pat resisting the urge to bring up the box again, and instead offering his bedroom to her whilst she was on strike. When he poses whether Jake had a girlfriend and she responds insouciantly, he senses she’s sparing him in some way, he wanting to know what it was all about.

Pat has an abbreviated workout and run with Tiffany before riding the train to Philly to meet his brother, and is greeted unexpectedly by a doorman/security guard, then is brought to Jake’s floor by an elevator operator, finally once getting ushered in by Jake, first takes in the expansive view, then Jake’s baby grand piano, he playing a couple songs for him after explaining having taken it up a few years ago. After, Pat applauds enthusiastically and learns Caitlin, Jake’s wife had brought the piano with her when she’d moved in and had helped Jake learn, due to her profession as a classical pianist. Jake then offers he meet Caitlin at the cafe for lunch, as long as Pat was game, and when they all meet up and sit, Jake and she lead the conversation, Pat asking about their wedding and feeling some pressure when realizing they’d been together for some years. Caitlin doesn’t reveal how long, for Pat’s sake, but he not feeling great about this setup his mother seemed to have implemented. They get through the meal in one piece though, Caitlin being dropped off at the apartment, whilst Jake and Pat ride a taxi to City Hall where they catch a train to the stadium.

Pat becomes aware of the current day of the week, which panics him about his being unaware of his brother’s career, Jake not going into it much other than admitting to being an options trader, he playing the stock market which kept him self-employed. Pat feels Jake thought he was inadequate in understanding the finer details, but Jake curious to know his thoughts on his wife, he guessing Pat wasn’t happy he’d kept his marriage from him, but Pat stating it was alright, currently overwhelmed with wanting to share the current events about Tiffany, the box with his name on it, their parents issues, and how he was getting stuck between them, as well as disappointment for missing his brother’s wedding, he deciding to talk of his feelings of nervousness about being confronted by the big Giants fan. Jake assures him their group was setting the tent up elsewhere as a precaution, and the odds of a Giants fan coming to a Green Bay game was slim, he declaring he was looking out for Pat.

When they get to the tent, they see their group in an argument with some men in a bus with The Asian Invasion on the side, Pat hearing Patel before he was in view, attempting to have Scott’s group move for the bus parking in the same spot consecutively as a good luck charm, Pat demanding they agree to move, they shocked, but doing so, Patel leaving him alone to decide whether he wanted to greet him or not, but when Scott asks after Pat’s reason for making them leave, and Jake inquires after whether he knew the small man, Patel had walked up with a platter of kebabs as a peace offering. Pat then decides to introduce Patel to his peeps, everyone at ease, Patel explaining to their group of the game Kubb, which his buddies were setting up currently, the now friendly groups playing the game, and Pat with Patel winning in the end. Jake paid Pat’s entrance fee for him, and he wanted to give his winnings in return, but Jake refused, Pat then making certain with Patel of their socializing being acceptable, he reminding him his chair rule, they all then going inside the stadium. When Pat gets a ride home in the bus, it’s after midnight, and the driver had honked his specially tweaked horn, it blasting the Eagles chant with all of the groups voices, entertaining Pat, regardless of its blaring. When he gets in, his father and he sing the Eagles fight song, Pat going downstairs to workout after his father had gone up to bed without another word to him, and Pat thinking about how hurt he still was by not having been able to go to his brother’s wedding.

Pat asks his mother about Jake’s wedding photos, she pretending to not know what he was talking about until confiding how he’d met Caitlin, so knew she existed, his mother comfortable putting the photos back on the wall again, she returning with an album and whilst he perused, hung pictures, he asking after her father’s profession, the man currently teaching at Julliard. Further inquiries make it clear whilst the two families were friendly, they hadn’t much in common, Pat getting a flashback of their father’s reaction during Pat’s wedding, he in awe of seeing him cry. Pat then asks his mother how she’d replaced the burgled photos, she attempting to hang on to the lie until Pat shows her the photos of he and Nikki he’d discovered, asking whether she disliked his wife, he questioning her with his other pressing thoughts, but none getting answered, since during her starting to try, she breaks down, Pat too angered to practice being nice, instead preparing for his run and seeing Tiffany ready outside.

During Pat’s next session, they start with Patel’s wife’s talent for her painting she’d done for the hood of the bus, Pat going from this topic to his current depression over a player whom had been reported having attempted to commit suicide and the man denying it, which made everyone now question his sanity. Pat also didn’t feel great about not learning this player’s history with the Eagles until recently, he not liking how his father and brother spoke of him as a “pill popper”, and Pat reading of the man maybe dealing with depression, he wondering why his family used this against the player, not truly able to relate his point, so leaving the topic. Pat’s next tailgate party is surrounded by bad vibes for this player, many people showing their hate creatively, and Pat tipping Patel off with his bad game playing. Patel attempts to lighten Pat’s view of the fans, and they not serious about the written abuse about said player, Pat debating Patel’s stance in this defense due to his profession.

Pat decides focusing on Jake and the bus driver’s game of Kubb and ignores the negativity of all the fans around him, and when they were in the stadium and a taunting chant is taken up by the crowd, Pat feels sorry for the player, even if he did seem to take it lightly, Pat putting himself in the man’s shoes. When the Eagle’s luck changes for the better though, Pat forgets about the player and rides the high of Baskett’s success, the game ending in their favor, but Pat still empathizing with the down and out player when he sees him leave the field. When Pat and group get back to the parking lot, Patel and he celebrate as well, everyone regrouping at their parking spots, Pat overjoyed, later on again getting dropped off by the bus. When he investigates inside, he sees an uncomfortable sight in his parents’ room, they no longer on the rocks, and Pat going for a run as his mother suggests, he going to Tiffany’s to inform her of their reunion, she preparing to go, and after their long run/walk, Pat talking her ear off. Tiffany hands him a letter with specific instructions of when to read it when she’s back at her parents home, he apprehensive what could be inside.

Pat finally gets his sit-down conversation-filled meal with his father, he nervous for his mother’s happiness getting crushed when his father back-slid, but trying to live in the present, he and his father talking football. Unfortunately, when his father switches topics unexpectedly to Tiffany, Pat respectfully asks to leave the room for getting the sensation of losing it, going for a workout and run. When he gets home again, he believes he’s turned his attitude around enough to read Tiffany’s letter, she confessing how she’d been conversing with Nikki for two weeks and the news of she having divorced him not long after he’d been admitted due to a crime he’d been in trouble for, Tiffany doesn’t detail, she supposing how Pat had dealt with the memory was to bury it.

Tiffany offered to be their go-between, since Nikki was also eager to communicate with him, but still uncertain by his stability and the fact the two each had a restraining order on the other, Pat’s taken out by his parents. Tiffany also had a condition upon his accepting this proposal, due to what she was risking, she wanted him to agree to dance with her in a contest, thinking it was fate which brought a man with such muscles to her, since she needed someone strong enough for the lifts she had in mind. Nikki even supports this idea, Tiffany then listing what was required if he agreed to her terms, he troubled by some of the information, but noting how parts did add up, seeing the silver-lining, of course being to get Nikki to come back to him in the end. The decision was obvious to Pat, and next morning he goes to Tiffany to inform her, she setting their next meeting for tomorrow afternoon. When they meet, Tiffany has him listen to the song she’d chosen, he agreeing of relating to the lyrics and so much so he was crying by the chorus hit, Tiffany stating how he’d use his pain for the dance.

Pat next decides to spare the monotony of his training sessions, as well since Tiffany was paranoid of being copied before she could open her own dance studio. He then lists the training in clip format: Pat racing Tiffany and winning, workout sessions, Tiffany giving him motivation on how to crawl across the floor and not being impressed, his father worrying when Pat begins humming at him whenever he mentions the Eagles, and his brother getting the same response when Pat returns his call and hears him mention Baskett and the game he missed; Pat uncomfortable when Tiffany rationalizes he touching her in personal spots being acceptable for their dance, he again working out, and Tiffany giving him pointers on how to lift her and supporting her with his hand on her groin.

Pat confuses Patel with his humming when mentioning football, his mother suggesting he give dance training a break to watch football with his father and brother, only getting the humming response. Tiffany gives him advice when she plans on doing her flip and how to give her extra air, his father tells him of Baskett failing because Pat wasn’t attending and he humming through it; Tiffany getting harsh when Pat continues to crawl incorrectly, showing him what she wants, he again repeating why he won at racing her, Ronnie visits to ‘workout’ and warns him of what Tiffany does to get what she wants, Tiffany then describing how Pat’s movements will correspond to one day’s worth of sun; His mother resorts to pleading with him to end his humming when she attempts to have him explain to Tiffany why he needed to watch one game with his father, and Pat then informing Patel why he wanted to be in the dance contest having to do with getting a chance to be the sun, the source of silver-linings.

Jake explains the difference between his wife understanding his football obsession and how Tiffany regarded Pat’s, he also stating how their father would definitely blame Pat if the Eagles lost. Tiffany then shows her part of the routine, Pat properly impressed by the emotion through her moves; His mother updates him of his father no longer being civil due to the Eagles’ loss and wanting Pat to end his humming. Pat then repeats how fast he is when he and Tiffany run, Veronica dropping by with Emily to inquire whether Tiffany and he were truly doing well with rehearsals since Tiffany hadn’t invited family to watch her dance for two years, and if they failed she’d regress into a depression. Pat kisses his photo goodnight with the promise of succeeding soon, he again working out, and Patel attempting to setup a carpool so Pat could get to the home game, and questioning whether he’d truly miss it. Tiffany then advises Pat needing to lock his arms so he wouldn’t shake during the lifts; Pat’s father then shown shouting at him from the top of the basement steps of he causing the Eagles to fail.

Pat works out again, Tiffany giving some props, but questioning whether they could fix everything before the day; She gives him his costume, working them tirelessly until Pat is running on fumes, she continuing as it grows later and starts them from the beginning. Tiffany then shaves his chest, a first for him, he questioning why he can’t wear a shirt, and she rationalizing, the sun didn’t. Again, Pat repeats of running faster than Tiffany, she having them practice the dance twenty five times two days before the contest, and stating how she didn’t feel they had enough people to cheer for them and her acting as go-between rode on their winning. Pat asks Patel to come to the dance contest with his family, he asking for a trade where Pat’d join him at the game after, if he agreed, his buddies also missing him, and Pat unable to declare a definitive answer, yet, so Patel stating the same, Pat feeling let down. He then calls his brother and leaves a too-long message about he coming with Caitlin to the contest, getting interrupted by Caitlin when he calls back, and hanging up. His mother agrees to go, but can’t promise his father would go with her.

Veronica gives them both a ride, dropping them off at the front, Tiffany leading him to the hall where they needed to register, but arriving too early, so the two sitting down to wait, Pat sensing she was nervous and inquiring if she was alright, her response being for him to not speak with her due to it being unlucky, which gives Pat a chance to become bitten by nerves, and when other young dancers start to register, they sign-in and change, an old fat lady approaching them about not wanting her daughter to have to undress in front of Pat, Tiffany and he going to a supply closet to wait, he then having Tiffany check to make sure no one was dancing to Kenny G. When everyone is changed, they get a knock on the door, Pat surprised by all the teenagers in attendance, and when they practice, he realizes they were up against other worrisome talent. After they are introduced on stage, Pat is disheartened by not seeing his family, but convinces himself his mother could be out there somewhere, easing his mind. They are set to perform last, Pat hearing the varying decibels of applause, his nerves kicking in once more when the girl before them gets the loudest response yet.

Pat attempts another look at the crowd as they get into position, but sees no one he recognizes, and then their music starts, his attention on his moves. Bonnie Tyler is playing and Tiffany is killing it, Pat seeing his performance as perfect, as well, but Tiffany doing most of the intricate movement. Pat considers how the dancer before them will most likely win, but due to their performance going so well, believing they could still have a chance. The final, most difficult lift is executed and accomplished, the audience pouring out thunderous applause, Pat then seeing his family and Patel with his buddies, Ronnie and his family with Tiffany’s parents having attended to support them, Tiffany coming clean about the contest not including a trophy, this only a motivational tool. She then informs him she’d help him speak with Nikki, Pat also getting the okay to talk football again, and then being thanked with emotion by Tiffany’s mother. After Pat’s mother shows how happy she is for him, Jake and Patel inform of whisking him in the bus for an overnight tailgate party, they first getting cheese-steaks, then playing Kubb and throwing the football for a bit, Patel reminding Pat to take his sleepy time pills. When Pat wakes the next morning among all the sleeping men, he goes outside to workout and run, he realizing how many buddies he now had, feeling only slight guilt for how he left Tiffany, but then looking forward to writing his first letter, and praying the Eagles turn their game-playing around today.

Then, the second letter from Nikki is shown, she stating the oddness of speaking with him after having been together so long and then a part for almost the same amount of time, she hoping their correspondence provides both sides with closure before she moves on. She also states how impressed she was by the length of his writing (his journal), she suggesting they cap it at five pages for Tiffany’s sake, she then complimenting her, but moving on to mention hearing how well he’d done in the dance contest, then sharing how terrible working at the high school had become, also giving sympathy about his father’s temper, but how great season tickets with Jake must be. She jumps into having gotten married again, she not wanting him to get the wrong idea after hearing certain parts of the diary of he holding out for a future, she confessing how she’d cheated on him. To end, she gives him props for reading her syllabus, he not alone with his view of the stories being downers, but literature attempting to harness both sides of life, she wanting Pat to succeed with implementing his new self and finding peace in his life.

Pat’s return letter jumps straight into his reading Huck Finn, as suggested, and liking it overall, but surprised by the excessive use of “the n-word”, besides this, being impressed how Huck stuck with Jim despite religion dictating hell would await him. He then mentions how distraught he’d become with her news, but also couldn’t help thinking her recommendation was also a way of relating he should follow his gut, he then reminding her of some good memories they’d shared, he hoping she’d keep an open mind at least whilst they wrote to each other, he attempting to show he’d changed and deserved a second chance, regardless of knowing wooing a married woman is sinful and he felt somewhat guilty, but needed to follow this path through.

Nikki’s letter states how proud she was he’d been able to make such a drastic turnaround, regardless the cause, she then making clear she’d offered he read The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn for entertainment and didn’t plan on secret meanings, she then giving The Catcher in the Rye as a good theme for what Pat was going through, she wondering how stable his current reality-base was, especially with what the future could bring. She then regards the memory he brought up, she stating how she’d continue to treasure it, but they having been too young, and her new hubby making her happy, this exchange only to supposed to be about making the farewell easier for closure.

Pat replies with football updates and how one of his old favorite players had shot and killed himself, he then regarding how terribly he’d been feeling since her last letter, even sharing it with Patel, but not how they’d made contact, Patel maintaining his reasons why being with Tiffany was better for him, but his love for her enduring all. He also mentioning how The Catcher in the Rye gave him the idea of she being the object he couldn’t help, but make a grab for, he hoping she’d agree to one meeting in person, and if he failed, he’d cope.

Her response was to show empathy for his past favorite player’s death, and having sympathy for his mother dealing with his father being a chore, she then reminding him how he’d broken the agreement by sharing the letter with Patel and would have to stop contact due to legal issues, but agreed with Patel’s assessment of their past relationship, and how their writing wasn’t helping him get over her, she ending by wishing him well.

Pat decides to attempt a request he believed she owed him, deciding to try and get her to meet with him on Christmas Day at the place they became engaged, he not able to give up on his happy-ending movie. He next accompanies his mother to Christmas mass, since his father wouldn’t go, he getting flashbacks of going to Christmas mass when Jake and he were kids, and during the priest’s story, prays for Nikki to agree to meet with him tomorrow, and being grateful God would help him get her back, then stating how upset his father was making his mother, but regardless, is happy God had helped him change his ways. When they get home, his mother pours them both some eggnog and reminisces of the ornaments he and Jake had made as children, Pat thinking about how he loved the way his mother unconditionally loved him, unlike Nikki, they then hearing the doorbell, and Pat thinking it could be Nikki, but instead Ronnie, Veronica, Emily, and Tiffany enter, they singing We Wish You a Merry Christmas. Ronnie and Veronica finish the first verse after Tiffany stops, Pat seeing how happy Ronnie’s family was, and was a bit jealous.

They all sit and his mother suggests he pass out their presents, everyone happy with what they received, Pat then opening theirs to him and seeing an autographed personalized photo of Baskett, the family then readying to leave to put Emily to bed, Pat’s mother thanking them, getting emotional, and Tiffany palming him a piece of paper before leaving, his mother stating how happy she was he was there for her, the two then off to their bedrooms and Pat opening the paper. Nikki’s last letter confirms she wouldn’t be meeting him and stating he needed to move on, his family and Tiffany able to ease this transition, and she not responding again or speaking with Tiffany after this, since she’d been cussing at her in defense of him, then declaring he no longer attempt communication with her, and reminding him of the active restraining order.

Pat gets up early to lift weights, he apprehensive about meeting Nikki, reminding himself how this was like every hopeless part of a movie before the perfect ending occurred, and God wouldn’t ditch him at his hour of pending despair. When he goes upstairs for breakfast, his father eats with them, they then exchanging gifts, Pat preparing for a ‘run’ and going off to see Nikki, happy they’d finally see each other again, and when reaching the spot, sits down and begins his waste of time. After it reaches darkness and he becomes more agitated, Tiffany shows up and apologizes, since she’d been the one writing all the letters, Pat finally understanding his reunion with Nikki would only ever be a dream, he then having violent thoughts and breaking down, Tiffany attempting to confess what parts were true, and then declaring her love for him which has him up and running away from her, he ditching her attempt at following, then angrily praying before he begins getting a beat down from unknown assailants.

When he regains consciousness, all his valuables plus shoes and belt have been stolen, he noting one leg and knee stiff, walking to the one house with Christmas decorations, he realizing he’d gotten mugged because of his angry prayer and immediately repents, he knowing he’d been forgiven when his buddy Danny asks what he’s doing near his Aunt’s nativity scene. Pat then shares how they first met, and how Danny had chosen Pat as his first person he speaks with in the bad place, he doing so after they’d agreed to an experimental treatment, they then becoming friends. When Danny offers Pat join them for Christmas dinner, he learns Danny had been released only the day before, Danny’s aunt calling an ambulance since he looked so messed up, and he learning his leg was so busted, a cast ending right below his hip is set. His mother, Jake, and Caitlin come and let him know Danny and his aunt had left. When Pat is released, he learns they’d found out what Tiffany had done when she’d called them, Jake blaming her for their less than idyllic Christmas, Pat becoming upset and apologizing to Jake as he drove them home.

Pat’s birthday lands on a Friday, the 29th, he taking an awkward shower as his mother protected his cast, he feeling less muscley for not working out, and they then going to his therapy session, Pat sharing all which had happened, he now speaking with Danny a lot to fill his time and writing some, but no longer reading or watching TV. After Pat shares how Danny and he played Parcheesi when he visited, Patel offers to confide why Pat had lost his memory, agreeing with Tiffany about he needing this obsession resolved, but her methods not necessarily helpful, of course. Pat maintains his movie may still have a good ending pending, and when Patel attempts to show life wasn’t film, Pat gets agitated, the both of them feeling concern, Pat’s based off of Patel’s look. When they’re on the ride home, his mother informs him of the party they were preparing and Nikki wouldn’t ever be in attendance when Pat inquires, he not feeling chatty as she cooks the meal. Jake and Caitlin come first and are unable to lift him from his funk, then Ronnie and Veronica come in with Emily, whom sits on his lap, making him feel a bit better, she then drawing on his cast, and after they eat and he opens his presents, one of them being a gym pass which was thoughtful, but Pat not as interested anymore, he asks after Tiffany, his mother having invited her, but she obviously not agreeing to come.

 Pat, Scott, and Jake attend the New Year’s Eve day football game, but Scott has to leave early due to promising his wife he would if the game didn’t matter, the Eagles already certain to be in the NFL East (whatever the fuck that means). Jake is also about to pull out for missing the start of Caitlin’s party, Pat reeling him back with a guilt trip. After the game, they meet Patel and friends at the bus, Jake leaving after a bit, and Pat getting a ride home on the bus, he getting another family dinner, but his father bowing out early with minimal chat. He and his mother watch the New Year’s festivities on TV, she stating how the new year would be a pleasant one, Pat agreeing even though it wasn’t shaping up the way she described, Pat thinking of how grumpy his father was despite the Eagles. When he notices his mother sleeping and looking chilled, he discovers a videotape which he plays after covering her with a blankie, he seeing his wedding reception. When their Kenny G song plays, Pat regains his memory of what happened the night he found Nikki cheating on him, losing consciousness after attacking the man when hitting his own head on the sink, and being drugged after waking at the hospital. He then comes back to himself and leaves a message on Jake’s machine, wanting a favor.

Tiffany writes a letter, she gauging if enough time had passed, and instructing he read it all if he hadn’t destroyed it, yet. She was aware of her ability to write surpassing her communication skills and relates how many people currently loathed her, Jake intimidating her with a death threat, so she having kept away and not making any kind of contact, her parents and therapist also showing their opposition to what she’d done to him, she still supporting her belief she’d done it for his own good, describing how many interests they shared and she hoping he’d give her another chance. Then she decides to share a personal story only her therapist knew, starting with details about her husband, he having been a cop whom spent half his time as a counselor for troubled youth at a local high school.

Tiffany mentions her hubby’s last words being a question regarding how she wanted to slow down their fuck sessions, he not taking this well, since he was used to a multiple amount per day, and when he left their home, he only having been on a lunch break, next Tiffany hears, he’d been injured, the looks on the other officers faces when she’d arrived at the hospital revealing he hadn’t survived the fairly ironic accident. She mentions blaming herself still over how he’d died being because she’d hurt him and after his death, she had begun to seek out men to sleep with so she could pretend it was her husband, which ended with the start of therapy, but she having considered using Pat in the same way when they first met. Not until they’d gotten to know each other did her opinion change, especially after they’d cried together. She then admits how she’d been behind getting his mother smashed, using her to get to him, but she now actually being buddies with her, she having decided to forgive her and deliver this letter. Also she admits she may not deserve Pat, but wrote the letters only once knowing Nikki wouldn’t ever return to him, she now hoping they could at least be buddies.

Danny reads the letter, Pat wanting an unbiased opinion, but he doesn’t respond to this topic, instead setting up the Parcheesi board, and the two playing, Pat deciding he needed to figure what to do on his own, anyways whether Danny had this in mind or had only wanted to focus on the game. He then mentions how good of a player Danny was, he rolling well most of the time, and how he used to be a great artist, as well, but since his second operation, didn’t seem to have this drive anymore.

Pat goes to a park after his cast had been off for one week, he thinking about goldfish in the nearly frozen pond he stood at, he desiring to throw a rock so as to break the ice, and then noticing Tiffany walking toward him, Patel having known she’d meet him as he’d requested. They stand silently for some time, Pat breaking the ice (pun intended) by inquiring why she hadn’t accepted his mother’s invite to his birthday. She reminds him of what Jake had said to her and Ronnie having commanded she leave him alone, they regretting getting them together. Pat had spoken with Jake about his conduct, and knew Tiffany was being honest due to the way she was acting, surprised and impressed Ronnie had stood up for him, even though if Veronica had known, she’d have shut that shit down, knowing Tiffany’s sensitivity.

Tiffany then apologizes profusely, it quiet between them again, Pat deciding he’d confide the ending to his old life’s story, Jake having brought him to his old house, where Nikki still lived with the fool she cheated on him with, he seeing her with him in their front yard with two small children having a snowball fight, the scene so idyllic, Pat was able to let her go and end his story with her there, not even desiring to approach her. Tiffany responds by giving him his belated birthday gift, a chart identifying cloud shapes, she noticing how he stared at them when they ran. The two then watch the single cloud mass, hoping for a break, Tiffany stating after some time of requiring Pat in her life, Pat realizing he did, as well, kissing her on the head and saying so.

One of the easiest books to read, found myself unable to break away after awhile. The story stands well on its own, I having forgotten most of the film, but this one being one helluva ride. Recommended to the mentally unstable and otherwise.

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The Tin Drum

I got this edition from the library so I only decided to read the first story, The Tin Drum and the third, but due to the due date and subsequent move out of the city of “Hell’s” Angels, I’ll have to wait to continue to the third. This story, however starts with Oskar, who’s interested in writing his thoughts down on paper and resides in a mental institution. He has periodic visitors, among them a lawyer and Bruno whom he refers to as his keeper; the latter brings him reams of “virgin” paper whenever he runs out. He then begins to share a story about his grandmother, which is when it feels like the story truly begins. (This is also where I’m noticing if I continue to read German novels it might be in my interest to look for the Polish authors, since so far I’m distinguishing this text more easily read and less depressing than more Germanic writers are. I also learned this is where Alice Cooper got his inspiration for his out-of-school song. It’s so blatantly similar I was surprised to recognize it so nonchalantly mentioned near the beginning of the book.) Oskar is precocious and quick for his age, which is shown throughout; it’s mentioned he’s a Virgo and shows the personality traits of one, also with the large ego of being even more clever than everyone around him, he plays dumb so a neighbor will teach him to read (since he blew his one and only chance to be taught at school; ignorant rigidity of the teachers of the era).

Once truly in the story, it’s easy to delve into Grass’ world; or so I believed, soon changed. Oskar starts to become something of a super-hero with his precision glass cutting scream with a side of mischief making and also with his drum sabotaging anything instrument-related he discovers within stomping distance, but there’s bits which are quite dull to get through and I identify myself plodding difficultly. Although after a rough patch, I read an article which made me stick with it. I’ve now made the connection between Grass and John Irving. They’re both clinical in their descriptions at times, sexual in a backward interest topic, and extremely vivid. (It’s also quite like a reverse Benjamin Button, but only if I want to stretch the analogy as far as it can go. But once I plodded ever vigilant to getting finished with this book, I realized how obsessed Oskar was with his mother; it was a nice realization once it dawned on me, which made him protective of her. Although once I was 124 page’s deep, it made perfect sense why he would be allowed this odd relationship with her, since he ended up suffering far more due to the unfortunate circumstances which occur to them).

Oskar befriends Herbert Truczinski when he is around 14 because Herbert has a plentiful amount of scars with “back” stories; Ha-ha. He is an old friend who influenced Oskar. (Later on Oskar’s Western Astrological sign is mentioned yet again, for personality quirk purposes, I suppose.) It describes, in some detail, many streets and stores in the city, and then gets much more interesting. He convinces Herbert Truczinski to buy him a ticket to accompany him, since Oskar still looked so young he was able to get in for the kid’s price. The only problem and good thing about this book, is it’s detailed structuring. (Sometimes it’s wonderful, other times it drags on and I need frequent breaks. This is like the German Les Miserables. And I believe I enjoyed Hugo over this by a bit. And then it shifts again and I realize I’m enjoying the story.) It is a book with waves of good and tired bits.

Oskar then discloses of keeping a book of all his drums and their “careers” since 1949 (the list-taking is a Virgo thing for sure, I can relate, and know many who do, as well.) Oskar also deals with a point where he had to question who his father was. Which was entertaining to figure out. (This is also the only book I’ve read so far which could make a card game called skat, let alone any card game, sound exciting and maintain it’s feel of camaraderie. I’m also realizing I’m relating to Oskar having to begrudgingly take command of the situation whilst under the stress of being bombed and keeping up a game of skat with his Uncle/Father and dying postal worker and staying calm and keeping Jan focused and the postal worker moving so he doesn’t literally lay down and die.) The end of the story is a grim one, but fascinating none-the-less.

Then, once I start thinking this is beginning to sound Don Quixote-like, lo and behold, he’s referenced not too long after my thought. Also Maria sure does become a good friend to him in the way of drums for awhile. Which was satisfying in a small way, but then to learn she eventually becomes Oskar’s first love when he’s almost 16 feels awkward, but doesn’t linger; instead, it’s more embarrassing for Oskar, since he allows himself to be treated like a small child still, but doesn’t consider changing since he knows how to work adults more easily in his current state. (Due to many of the course sexual references, I keep wondering why I’m continuing the story: it’s well written, descriptive, imaginative, also Grass shares a birthday with Oscar Wilde, which I believe foretelling since I read Wilde’s complete works and it may be the qualities which are helping me stick with this: those being listed above.) Although, Oskar’s introduction to oral is quite surprising and amusing, but also odd since the reader has to catch the metaphor. Any 15-year-old would hate to remember or at least truthfully divulge a story like this, but he does “get lucky” in a lucky way.

Grass, through Oskar also makes known something which should become a more known disgust if not fret of men. Oskar says at one point he despises how his downstairs takes over at the most bewildering of times, with no rhyme or reason. There are also many strange and sexually ambiguous characters whom are thoroughly explored. Some are more fascinating and easier to read than others, but they are all well-written and the ones who emote a sense of respect towards one another and pure friendships bloom because they are good, but some are troubled more than others, as well. Oskar becomes more desperate after meeting Maria and she becomes a more constant presence in his life, until she decides a different path and he’s surprised by what she does and doesn’t do in this time in their lives apart. Oskar has some strange fantasies about his family revolving around his grandmother’s skirts. Oskar gains a crew when he is followed and then shows them his breaking windows talent. The leader takes him in as one of them, begrudgingly, and Oskar takes the opportunity to make himself seem beatific by introducing himself to them as Jesus. Oskar then becomes the new leader of the youthful gang and proceeds to get them to implement troublesome plans, which he designated out to his crew as he sits back and hears about the wonderful mayhem. Oskar becomes more egotistical, once Lucy starts ruffling his feathers. He at one point sees himself as a, “human unicorn” and the most important of his group, the Dusters. They certainly do undertake some blasphemous missions which Oskar shows mild guilt at the start of the discussion of his Catholicism, but by this point, he’s obviously reached a new more contemptuous viewpoint of what he feels acceptable sacrilege.

It starts to adopt a dark humor I enjoy, in the church during their prank and how one of the Dusters gives a speech so moving, even Oskar has the desired feeling of soul-saving sermonizing. The next episode of Oskar, preludes us with a story of a young man who climbs a high-jump dive-board at a public pool, to see the view, when his buddies put him on the spot whilst everyone’s attention was already being diverted by his climb, from the start. Oskar introduces his similar story with the Dusters, but for them, it’s Lucy who’s a part of a panel of judges who was to encourage the Duster’s to jump. Then she tries and fails to get Oskar to jump, proving one does not have to be conquered by suggestion. Even when Lucy tries her whispering tactic, “Jump, Sweet Jesus, jump.”, doesn’t work, Oskar makes his way back the way he got there. Matzerath is then approached by a court official mysteriously alluding to getting, “the child off the streets.” Calling him gullible and easily swayed by “bad crowds”, essentially. Lucy does become a thought of dread to Oskar since he doesn’t see her again, so when he hears of unexpected visitors at the mental institution, he fears it’ll be her. Oskar still does utilize his size and his ability to act toddler-like to get him out of trouble, if he can. Even though by this time he should be around eighteen or nineteen years old. (I must remind myself he wouldn’t necessarily have found maturity at his age since he became counter-obsessively using his “baby” act for so long.) Oskar has also kept his respect for Goethe and Rasputin since his first discovering and learning to read by them so long ago. Oskar usually feels the need to show off his talent to those who show talent themselves or to help others through his talent. He liked pretending he didn’t care, out of arrogance and ego, (in line with what I would expect) which doesn’t change through his childhood or young adulthood.

Matzerath’s cellar is shown, along with the rest of the family, plus Oskar to await the invading Russians with devastating results. The next bit gives background on the city name and who pillaged it. It goes on about the history of how battles started and how the people tried to defend their homes. The Russians are still about, so Oskar and the family stay hiding in the cellar, to wait. The man who takes over the grocery story helps the family deal with some hard tasks Lina Greff would have done, if not for her hosting a houseful of Russian soldiers. They move in to Mother Trucszinski’s flat. (Then I learn Matzerath hates margarine as much as I hate it, today!) Similarities throughout the ages. Also something similar is how the newly adult military “kids”, goof off during their tours. These Russians take what now is considered one of the world’s most beloved pastimes and wheeled transportation, free-style bicycling with items taken from homes and jumping ramps off them and using bathtubs, grandfather clocks and radios, among other items, doing stunts. Meanwhile Oskar is studying Fajngold the grocer to see if he can deduce what he’s contemplating. Whilst trying to get where they’re going, they accrue two young Russian cadets with tommy guns to escort them wherever they’re going and they make their unwanted presence known by their obvious clumsy inexperience trying to cover it up with silent, serious exteriors. How serious would you take a sixteen year old? Exactly.

Oskar starts feeling cheated by not having the shop go to him and only having Kurt and Maria to show for his years with his family. Their goal of destination is shared, and they continue on foot due to the obstacles being too large to get to where they needed with whom they had in tow. Kurt doesn’t change, his brandished reckless violence making him easy to see him as an expendable brat. No one is beyond Kurt’s abuse, but in this section, he goes after a caged lovebird. Oskar has come to a life-changing decision near the same time his son, Kurt does. A long coming confession from Oskar regarding the Party pin Matzarath almost got caught having in his possession is also confessed. Oskar’s main memorable moments of Matzarath being about his cooking and nothing so sentimental as his possible paternity. He lets his last Bebra-bought drum symbolize his farewell to Matzarath. Oskar believes the nosebleed which follows is the start of his growth. Shugger confirms this when reacting with fear as Oskar faints out the end of the scene,ths also when Oskar’s height is learned. Also, by this time it’s determine he’s older than 21 and he was only three feet by then. A reiteration of the cemetery and Heilandt’s strange reaction to Oskar’s growth spurt is gone over. He also tries to forgive his son his violent act against him by trying to believe he did it to help him accelerate his growth, so Oskar would finally get some acknowledgement from Kurt he is his father. Doctors also come up with a physical explanation for Oskar’s stop and then spurt of growth later, which Oskar doesn’t believe at all. His thinking was, he had started growing and stopped after, and before the physical “traumas” occurred.

When Oskar becomes ill due to his sudden growth a lady doctor is found, and he appreciates her upfront and terse countenance, which I can relate to, Grass was thorough in at least his astrological and most likely his geographical knowledge. I also learned more about the characters of Rasputin and Goethe both of which I haven’t read or done much research on, but soon enough, I will be. Fajngold realizes his family plus Maria and the children (Oskar included) were infested with lice where the explanation goes on with Oskar feeling more relief whilst his illness when Fajngold disinfected everyone putting him completely at ease. (It then mentions a concentration camp story involving Fajngold, which is engaging, but I’m indifferent to, since I’ve sworn off reading Holocaust related materials due to the overabundance of reading them in school.) Oskar’s illness continues to recede and flare through the spring. Fajngold changes the grocery store’s merchandise and Kurt becomes a prolific salesman at the age of 5. They get a visit from Oskar’s Grandmother where Fajngold and she swap stories. After, Maria decides to go live with her sister. Mr. Fajngold bids them farewell and Oskar uses a way of seeing the world which has become easy to adopt and quite calming to apply: He says, Fajngold waves them goodbye from the train station until he no longer exists. I use the same concept, depending on mental faculties and if the person has done everything in their power to combat it, if they haven’t I don’t consider them “real” and don’t necessarily give them the deserved normal courtesies all “healthy-minded” individuals worked at receiving through normal means.

The next section is told by Oskar’s nurse, Bruno, of when Oskar and family are on the train and it keeps being stopped by gangsters and such and when Oskar showed a picture of his Grandmother, it saves their belongings from being stolen for an odd reason, which is why I bring it up at all. Oskar also attributes his growth, lengthwise and of his, ahem, nethers, were aided by the jiggling and jolting of the tracks, also relieving the constant pain so much growing gives, another funny observation. He also lost the ability of breaking glass with his voice on this trip. After getting Oskar to a hospital, Maria gets him transferred closer to where her sister lives. By the close of this part, Bruno finishes his writing and a full description of Oskar’s person and also a mysterious charge Oskar was put in to the hospital for in the first place, is mentioned finally. Oskar continues saying he doesn’t even bother reading what Bruno wrote. He than says he’s grown another inch and was released from the hospital. He then goes to Maria’s sister Guste’s house to discover Maria dealing black market synthetic honey and Kurt begins a business venture of his own, even having a mysterious source which irritates Oskar for not knowing whom it could be. Oskar reiterates Bruno’s description of himself and what his view is toward himself: handsome, despite his hump which now developed on his back.

Oskar applies an everyday exercise I use, except he conceives it, perhaps more “fun” to label, in this case, happiness according to various types of stone since he was able to acquire a job helping a tombstone engraver, similar to Simon Birch now I think of it. Possible tsk-tsk on John Irving?Anyways, they both get fitted for suits and Oskar pulls off a demonic intellectual look whilst Korneff, his employer, who has boils all over his neck looked quite impressive as well. Oskar was feeling lucky, so he decides to ask Gertrude, a nurse from the hospital he stalks once in a while and they go out to dance. Oskar was going to back out of the date if he could when he realized Gertrude is normal looking outside her uniform, but doesn’t get the chance, so when they get to the dance hall, they wait a bit to get settled and then Oskar asks Gertrude for a dance, which is hesitantly accepted. The completion of the dance has everyone clapping to them and Gertrude becomes embarrassed and excuses herself. The night gets more eventful when he meets two young telephone-operators, one of which asks Oskar to dance. Gertrude isn’t seen again, other than the hospital. Oskar then talks of the headstones he’s carved and where they were put. He witnesses a woman’s exhumation and when he tries to help the diggers (since he had his spade handy) he shovels some of the woman’s corpse fingers and notices their beauty, oddly. Oskar spirals his conversational thoughts to himself until ending up acknowledging he may have hallucinated Lucy Rennwand when he thought he saw her on the train.

Oskar decides to move on from his telephone girls and their connections in favor of taking Maria out and recognizing he’s been responsible for Maria and Kurt’s financial well-being for over a month already and how he was in preference of this, also being told it was partly due to Kurt’s connection drying up. He proposes to Maria and gets strung along until she locates the scissors to finally cut Oskar’s hope of typical family living loose. Oskar mopes about his declined proposal, thinking it would have led to his career as a stonecutter being expanded etc., but because of the plan not working, now he must capitalize off his hump instead. He also spent his time sitting in the park for long periods and letting his appearance go, naturally. On one of his sittings he’s approached by a girl at the behest of her companions to uncover a model to paint. Oskar took to the offer seemingly readily, but he soon realizes being sketched may not mean it coming out flatteringly. He isn’t bother by this for long, since Oskar keeps an aloof exterior, and is soon offered a position to pose nude for the instructor who sketched and molded Oskar’s form in clay. They bonded over their previous careers and Oskar continues to pose for the students on the side. As he advances forth to posing, he becomes something of a hidden gem, until the painters on the floor above discover him and see what the sculptors have been studying and Oskar poses for them also, which seems to satisfy his obsession with wanting his blue eyes to be accounted for, but like the others, the students use blue for most of him, (which reminds me of Sacré Bleu) which describes the reason of some painters obsession and fascination with it.

Oskar decides to join in what is known as carnival week where his costumes makes Kurt laugh so hard he can’t stop coughing. His costume didn’t have the same effect on the carni-revelers, though, but he makes it to the party, where the artists try to sell food and whatnot rather than actually partying. Oskar makes acquaintances with two Chinese lesbians, interestingly and they “make use” of his hump in a way which gives him confirmation of his hump being lucky for women. His companionship with them and the champagne turns him introspective, though and he contemplates the meaning of life. After, he is asked for a cigarette from an old acquaintance, meanwhile being captivated by the soldier acquaintance’s young, drunk date while reminiscing. The girl’s name immediately reminds me of Wonder Boys since they share the name Ulla. Michael Douglas’ character says, “I never forget an Ulla.” Which apparently helped me not to forget either. Oskar decides to help Ulla in her want to becoming an artist which makes Lankes happy. They all retire at Lankes’ place and Oskar gets a chance to be closer to Ulla; the horn dog. When Ulla confesses to them of not wanting to be a muse to artists, but only wanting to “belong” to Lankes, he institutes the usual acceptable response to women in those days and she accepted being a model to the academy, with the help of Oskar. For a “young girl” she is of model-esque height and Oskar and she become the popular duo with the title of Madonna 49, where Oskar poses as a broken Jesus. Maria is upset by the poster which is made of them, but it does get sold for a generous sum and Oskar and Ulla become a popular modeling team. Ulla doesn’t escape Lankes’ wrath, though, since he seemed to be of the malevolent nature he had shown from the start. Oskar also developed these feelings toward Ulla, oddly, but instead of succumbing to assault, he treated her to going out, either to a pastry shop or to buy her small gifts.

One of the artists had a more intimate relationship with Ulla, later described by getting her in a certain position and doing a similar act as those of porn-buffers without having to touch her; ha-HA. Oskar was used to being made to have some object put in his hands to offset Ulla and eventually he brings the one object Oskar had no desire to hold and he says so. Ulla convinces him otherwise, with much distress on Oskar’s side. Maria sees this version of the Madonna 49 and cracks Oskar with his son’s school ruler. She believed it was vulgar and felt above him due to her upstanding position in a delicatessen, she wanting nothing more to do with Oskar. She takes it back, but Oskar didn’t want to continue living with his son and her sister. Maria agreed and offered Oskar to look for a place not far from them, which he seemed to agree to. Oskar stays with the Academy of Arts to be painted and drawn for the winter through the next summer and has no trouble admitting his own foolishness, identifying with Parsifal, a fool also. Besides, he visits Korneff the stone-cutter once again and ends up being offered some part-time work on top of posing as a model due to rent being raised.

After starting a carving and finishing in 3 hours, Oskar’s paid and goes to look at an apartment, which he accepts and learns a nurse, among other tenants share Zeidler’s home. Then sufficient description of the abode and Oskar witnessing a spat between Zeidler and his wife. Zeidler’s outburst resulted in him breaking and cleaning up a glass which made Oskar remember his glass shattering days, minus the clean-up after. Before Oskar takes his leave of them to go to his room he demonstrates some acrobatic moves to show how healthy he is since Zeidler asked how he stayed so small and also about whether he still played the drum attached to his suitcase which he didn’t care whether he did due to his absence from the house on most occasions, which didn’t impress upon Oskar since he played little, if at all. Oskar begins to think of the nurse which he admits is an obsession he can’t and doesn’t want to give up on. Bruno believes only men make proper nurses since they give particular care and sometimes are cured whilst women have the ability to seduce the patient sometimes to recovery and sometimes through “seasoned” erotic death.

Oskar won’t let Bruno’s view mar his of lady nurses though, due to being saved by them every few years. Oskar believed Bruno’s opinion was a professional jealousy. He then lists all the nurses he’s loved and been saved by through the years until the one he’s rooming with is related. He explaining having to take a bus which brings him straight to the stop which picks up nurses and it’s the same as his own and at first he acts with distaste to them, but than hunts them, essentially for their smell coming off the uniforms. He begins noticing them pass him at work which costs him an indiscriminate amount of money. After, Sister Dorothea, the nurse rooming next door begins to catch Oskar’s attention more by her noise of coming and going. He also has a tendency to check the door whenever he hears her and when the mail comes, he would take special interest in what she received. Obsessive little Oskar even has an inventive fantasy involving becoming a physician to be closer to Dorothea. Oskar goes on to say how his whole life wasn’t completely overrun by nurses and how he had to stop inscribing tombstones once the summer semester started at the Art Academy. He teamed up with Ulla once more and they both made good wages from modelling. Lankes has left Ulla to which she easily forgot by immersing herself in the art of Meitel; she believes her relationships will be long-lasting and serious. She did learn one thing stuck from him and their engagement, which was an extended vocabulary which she tested on Oskar, after which another artist began collaborating ideas of Oskar’s which eventually included the addition of a nurse being portrayed by Ulla.

One day though, Oskar tries Dorothea’s door, which is unlocked and he decides a bit of breaking and entering is in order since half the job was already done (her room was unlocked already). The room is described in a dilapidated way and Oskar identifies the smell he’s been noticing is vinegar and then wonders if perhaps she’s been having to use her meager sink to wash her hair with said liquid considering she may not have been able to use the more pleasant accommodations of the hospital bathroom facilities. He then discovers her hair color and she might be losing her hair to which, in his blind love of her, he wants to help her with by supplying her with some hair treatments as soon as he can. Then he takes some of her hair from a comb and stores it in his wallet, removing what was in there to make room. After slight examination of her bed he decides to give in to the temptation of curiosity to look in her cupboard. Oskar deduces even more about Dorothea from the cupboard which fascinated Oskar, making judgments about the articles she did have and the amount of importance she must have had of them. Oskar then becomes intrigued by the type of books she stored in her hat compartment. He wanted so much to become a part of her cupboard area, he moved into an area which fit him perfectly and closed the doors most of the way shut. An item he discovers in the cupboard behind his back brings a reminiscence to him of his mother, Jan Bronski, and Matzerath when he was three. Dorothea’s belt reminded him of an eel from his memory. Oskar’s recollection expands to eclectic thoughts of his mother, which ranged from her singing a particular song to how she would gorge herself on a particular foodstuff until she couldn’t divulge in it any longer, to her graveyard of choice. Then it’s alluded he may have masturbated and smudged the belt to the point of needing to buff it to make it look like it did, before leaving her room. Cheese and crackers, nasty little Oskar.

Oskar becomes quite interested in learning who a Dr. Werner was to Dorothea and searched her books for an inscription or picture and found neither, which pleased him since he seemed to have the upper hand in personal details about Dorothea. Meanwhile another tenant, Mr. Munzer seemed to want to get Oskar’s attention to which Oskar failed to notice nor care due to being consumed with Dorothea, but he did feel a little guilty after, since talk with Mr. Munzer would at least break the lonesome monotony. After a few days past, he continued his modelling with Ulla and they posed as different Greek mythological gods and demigods. Not long after, he was getting the mail and noticed a letter from Dr. Werner and Mrs. Zeidler set it at her door and Oskar bided his time calmly and then boiled some water to steam the letter into opening, the little blighter. He learned Dr. Werner did have feelings for Dorothea even though his letter was extremely conservative in intimate details. When finished he reseals it and leaves the letter where he found it, then hears Mr. Munzer speaking to him from the other end of the hall asking for water. Oskar makes an excuse for himself to comply with the request since he didn’t think it right to do it because he asked unless he were ill. Mr. Munzer or Klepp as Oskar began to know him as, had such a pungent aroma, from his first moment well into the times he would come to visit Oskar in the hospital which Bruno would open every available window once he left (similar to a character in Kingdom, another Stephen Fry TV show). Klepp, at the time of his bedridden-ness had taken to pissing in empty beer bottles; his living in filth is quite extensive. Oskar, at the time, introduced himself as Matzerath for some reason, since he was feeling humiliated at the moment. Only on rare occasions did he use the name Bronki, usually using his Grandma’s name Kojaiczek or by his first name. Klepp looked older, but proved younger than thirty.

Oskar then is told by Klepp of he believing in destiny, but doesn’t believe everyone may be born for a reason since he was certain he was born by mistake. He also discerns the length of Klepp’s stay thus far at Zeidler’s. They agreed it was a shame they hadn’t met sooner and blamed him for not mentioning it sooner. Oskar then learns the reason for Klepp’s being bed-ridden is because he’s determining the state of his health…(Okay). Then Oskar shares a pot of spaghetti which would make anyone pause, if not throw away all set before him and run to the nearest five star Italian restaurant, but Oskar, bless his heart, first stared and then ate it down like a little champ, then to his surprise and my disgust and dubiousness, enjoyed the contents. Oskar and Klepp share their interest as they get to know each other spending their day together, then Oskar decides to pick up his drum once more for Klepp and to Oskar’s surprise and pleasure, Klepp joins him with his flute. After finishing their impromptu jam session, Klepp gets up from bed and washes himself, like a purification process, then they congratulate each other warmly, for their musical moment was to them, like a resurrection. Klepp’s new lease on life had everything to do with Oskar deciding to team up in his jazz band idea. He bacame a new man, but because of this, Oskar believes Klepp is trying to do the same for him, to get him out of his mental hospital bed, because he had “deprived” him of staying in his own. Oskar is then mentioned to possibly not being in his bed on his own recognizance, but also because it was court-appointed and so Klepp, besides his futile attempts of convincing Oskar out of bed, also petitions the court, all because Oskar begrudged Klepp of his own and although they had the two of them in the band, they felt a guitarist was needed and took pictures and enjoyed the movie theater a lot. In the end, Klepp found a wife instead; ha.

Bobby, who led a dance band in a bar would let them play with him sometimes because he got a kick out of Oskar’s drumming even though, he also was a percussionist, despite a finger missing on one hand. Oskar meanwhile, was getting distracted with thoughts of Dorothea during their gigs and so would miss his cue periodically. Klepp would misconstrue these moments as hunger pangs and order sausage. Oskar let him believe this was so as to let him torture himself with thoughts of her independently from Klepp. Oskar had also given up modelling unless with Ulla, who was engaged to Lankes for the Nth time, but only if they needed cash for more movies, otherwise Oskar was dedicated solely to Klepp’s band. He also rarely visited Maria and Kurt since her new husband stayed present.

Klepp and Oskar then had a task of tacking down a fiber carpet-runner for Zeidler so as not to break anymore glasses, so when they finished and tested it, they were in the midst of congratulating themselves, when their doing so put Zeidler in a spiteful tantrum and began breaking glasses. After this Oskar finally meets Sister Dorothea. It was after a late night with Klepp and having left him to continue the search for a guitarist, Oskar goes home with the intention of sleep and failing to do so, comes up with the idea it was due to having stood on the leftover coconut-fiber mat and the stimulation had perked his brain into restless activity. He hears two doors of the front half of the home open and close and decides it’s Klepp, though not believing it at the same time. He resolves to actually stand on the mat since he kept thinking about it, then he uses it to cover his lower half, since he left his pajama’s at Maria’s for washing. He then enters the hallway and aims his trajectory for the toilet, determining one had occupied it already, but didn’t leave since it was the only un-fiberless-carpeted area, to the dismay of the female sitting there already. Oskar tried to make a light bantering response to her scream and cries of him getting out in the hopes of distracting from the awkwardness. She wasn’t having it and tried to push Oskar out, but aimed too high.

When Maria re-aimed lower and felt the fiber she screamed again and thought Oskar an evil entity, which amused Oskar when she asked again who he was. Oskar playfully goes along with her feared presumption and reveals to her he’s Satan, coming for her which makes her ask the reason and Oskar, given the opportunity to confess the truth, replies he’s in love with her, which Sister Dorothea wasn’t about to tolerate and said so. Then when trying to escape, she runs into Oskar and the pelt and his body made her feel faint. She fell and Oskar helped guide her descent onto the carpet outside the toilet. He continues his joke in the hallway and tries to “excite her with the carpet he had used as cover for himself; what a little pervert. Meanwhile Oskar couldn’t get excited himself to his own embarrassment and tried to think of his past exploits to help him along whilst referring to “it” as “Satan”; in this case, suitable, but he couldn’t unearth the feeling. When she felt his skin and humpback, Oskar admitted the truth of his name and feelings for her. She responded with sad tears and left him sitting there and locked herself in her room, rightly so. Then Oskar, still not having given up, goes to her door and scratches at the front whilst hearing what must be her packing up her belongings to leave; sensible lady. Oskar gets this confirmation when she opens the door finally, kicks him aside and leaves, to Oskar’s dismay. He also has woken the Zeidler’s with all the noise and should leave the hallway for his room, but he stays lying there whilst Mr. Zeidler instructs him he should get to his room, and when he stays silent, unmoving, admits to Oskar they should put him out because of his behavior, whilst Mrs. Zeidler giggles until being told to be quiet by her husband who is getting properly rageful, but Oskar is saved by the entrance of drunken Klepp with their equally drunken new guitarist. They pick him up and dress him, then get his drum on him and take him out as he continues to wax woe. They sit on the river Rhine and jam, during which they come up with a name and Oskar treats them all to breakfast.

Oskar and the band liked playing alongside the Rhine so much they befriended a restaurant and nightspot owner through mutual environmental interests. Whilst they played, Schmuh, the owner, “hunted” sparrows. They didn’t start off friendly, though and had met whilst both were occupying space in the area. Schmuh had been annoyed of their playing scaring away the birds whilst Klepp complemented his rhythmic shooting perfectly in time with their music, making Schmuh pleased. Schmuh’s wife thought it would be serendipitous if he employed them at his restaurant and he agreed. Klepp negotiated their salaries to everyone’s satisfaction. The Onion Cellar, was a newer higher class restaurant nightclub which a list of other quirky sounding titles are listed. It was like any dance club one would wait in a line to get into these days. The Onion Cellar was actually at one time a ground-level apartment, so whilst it didn’t have a cellar, the name still suited the place. (Similar to some cafe’s and restaurants in downtown Phoenix , as I’m told and I’m sure, as well as other interesting cities, but couldn’t say off the top of my head.) Anyways, a summary of The Onion Cellar and how artsy and classy it is follows, along with the other restaurants, old and new in the vicinity, the impression being about the reason for The Onion Cellar’s popularity revolving around Schmuh, a shawl and the entertainment he gives and interaction with the guests.

It’s then shared why the place is called The Onion Cellar. (I also found a pairing of food I have yet to try, but am curious about: Onions with apples, and/or onion rings; I like the idea.) Also there’s a second, more “human conditional” reason people flock to The Onion Cellar, a sad and pathetic one, but still a reason we struggle with in this century as well. Meanwhile, Oskar and the band, have their out-of-the-way sitting spot and hear all the people confess here and Oskar goes on to mention a few guests appearances as well as a favorite confessor. Oskar is one strange character himself, suffering abuse from the same person the confessor spoke of. All for love, interestingly enough. Oskar loses both big toenails because of it. Oskar also speaks of a young odd-couple who meet through the train and end up at The Onion Cellar. (It worked out quite well for them, which I believe, the first couple had a good outcome as well.) The band was there to help get the people back to normal and move on for the next group to come in. Quite odd reasons for a band to be hired, but this seems to be Grass’ shtick. Also like certain jobs, the band had a clause forbidding them to use onions how they are used in The Cellar, which suited all of them one way or another: Oskar had his drum to help him, Klepp was backwards and didn’t understand the right time for such emotions, and Scholle was too happy of a person. I can identify with all three, some moments are easier to laugh at, plus a sunny/realistic disposition doesn’t hurt.

Then after Schmuh’s wife gets a hold of an onion whilst with her friends Schmuh is partial to, she confesses terrible habits he had making him give an extra round to the group after his wife and her entourage leave, which makes everyone go crazy to the point of Schmuh asking Oskar to do something since Klepp only found amusement in the debacle and Scholle followed Klepp’s suit. Oskar drums them like the pied-piper to get themselves together, out the door and apparently thinking they’re kindergarten age making them all have a surprising reaction, which stays with them, including Schmuh well after releasing them, leaving them all wet, but not worse for wear.

Schmuh couldn’t forgive Oskar his charade, though since it didn’t include the “power” of his onions. He fired Oskar and the band then goes so far as to hire a fiddler passing for a gypsy, but when complaints and steadfast refusal to continue attendance at The Onion Cellar from regulars, Schmuh had to accept a compromise. It being only to play three times a night with the fiddler playing three as well, plus a raise and tips. It goes well until the day of Schmuh’s death. The Schmuh’s and band had gone on a Rhine outing. On this day Schmuh goes against his 12 cap limit, the dope. When they’re ready to leave, Oskar decides to stay for a walk instead and they go on without him. Oskar takes the same direction and soon sees the Schmuh car overturned with only one serious victim. The reason behind the crash is reminiscent of The Birds, except with sparrows. At Schmuh’s funeral, his widow still in the hospital, Oskar is approached by a doctor who was a guest at The Onion Cellar and present for Oskar’s regression session, wanting to offer him a contract as a solo drumming act to perform large concerts for equally large sums of money. Oskar would have done so if not so shortly after Schmuh’s death and declines until a healthy mental-health vacation is had, to think it over. Oskar does accept an advance along with calling card, though and goes on his trip with Lankes, preferring Klepp, but hospital-bound and also Maria, but she would have had to bring Kurt and they both were still tied to Stenzel. Oskar also wanted to invite Ulla, but Lankes hi-jacked the offer as well as boxing Ulla’s ear for considering going. Oskar was now on vacation with Lankes and they head to Normandy where a taste of how stingy he is being related. He had brought his easel and Oskar his drum along with luggage.

They stayed on the Atlantic Coast and Lankes traded his picture for a fish, which Oskar cleaned and made ready to cook as Lankes found wood and cartons for himself to paint on. Lankes then, needing to make sure he got the best of everything wanted Oskar’s opinion as to which side of the fish was best, Oskar gave him the advice he remembered from both of his parents, which conflicted, and of a doctor which Lankes didn’t trust the advice of, anyways. He does the opposite of the doctor’s advice to be safe, but it didn’t fully satisfy him until not only did Oskar offer him to try his piece, but reassure him his tasted better, after trying his in turn. What a Seinfeld; his mother told an anecdote where he wouldn’t accept a slice, but wanted the whole pie or nothing at all. Then Lankes informs Oskar he ran into Lt. Herzog and how he’s been going to Cabourg for years and would visit them, which he did, surveying the area and then trying to inspect inside their nature-made abode, which Lankes refused to allow him to do. When Herzog wouldn’t take no for an answer, Lankes puts him on his back with fork from fish still in hand. Then Lankes made sure he got the point by dragging him, then tossing him over a dune. Herzog made a quick exit after. When done reminiscing about some nuns Lankes and Oskar had met way back when, some real nuns come walking along the beach, one young, far ahead of the others, which Lankes keeps an eye on from the start. At first she declines the advances and follows the others calling to her, but when the nuns are ready to leave, she makes her way back on pretense of shell-gathering for children and does naughty business with Lankes in their hut. After she leaves to go swimming, Lankes detects inspiration in her being a nun along with titles for the art inspired by her which he makes some success from which prompts Oskar to call up the doctor to do likewise for himself. Klepp was feeling spurned because of Oskar’s growing lack of interest to playing jazz, until he discovers a replacement.

Oskar discloses how he couldn’t consider moving back in with Maria and how he’d occasionally drop by the Academy as a guest model. Ulla, proving to be a ditz or at least in the eyes of Oskar, dropped Lankes again because he kept cheating on her and didn’t beat her any longer; odd. Oskar seemed to be struggling with the idea of calling Dr. Dosch and so tore up his card to realize it was engraven to his memory. He was obsessed with the thought of calling, he finally did and was asked to come in the same day to meet with the boss. When he arrives he’s surprised to see Bebra in an interesting condition. Bebra begins by going through all the terrible acts Oskar’s committed. A contract is then set before him which allowed him to drum in concert and start touring. Though Oskar had the money advanced to him to move, he stayed on for Klepp’s sake who didn’t like Oskar’s official contract dealings, but Oskar didn’t care. When he started his tour, the publicist had made him out to be a faith-healer and so the crowds were drawn to him were of the mid-to later years. Oskar became so popular, a word was made from his name. After his third tour he made a studio album which made him a rich man, but he still didn’t move out of Zeidler’s, because of Klepp and due to the room where Dorothea resided. Oskar decided to proposition Maria with a promise most would consider difficult to refuse: He’d finance her own delicatessen if she didn’t marry Stenzel. She, being a proper business-woman, goes for it and now has two branches.

Oskar then has a nice inheritance given to him after learning Bebra had died many weeks before whilst he was touring. Due to grief, Oskar cancelled some tours without giving sufficient notice and was sued. To make matters worse Klepp had decided to get married and didn’t invite him, then left Zeidler’s, Oskar being the only tenant left. Zeidler had begun to treat Oskar with respect once he became famous. To prevent further depression and/or loneliness, Oskar rents a rottie named Lux and he’d walk him in the hall. They also ended up walking the Rhine where Lux would lead him. Oskar began disliking Lux’s loyalty, even when setting him off the leash, the dog still following and when Oskar kicked him and the dog would run, he’d loyally return, acting guilty. At one point at a rye field, he gets the dog to stay gone for longer and reminisces until noticing, upon Lux’s return he has some object of doggie desire with him. It turned out to be something of human relation and so Oskar took the object with him and then Vittlar, noticing Oskar and dog, compliments the dog. Oskar, not in the mood for conversation with Vittlar asks him why he’s up in a tree, and he responds it’s to do with apples. Oskar gets more annoyed when he’s dragged into an allegorical conversation and Vittlar asks what Lux found in the rye field. He continues to question Oskar until getting to his point, since he had seen more than he’d let on. Oskar, after being properly introduced to Vittlar, called him a friend from then on, even though Vittlar had, after turning him into the police. Then Vittlar’s testimony in court is shared, during which Oskar is described acting oddly with the object found, making stops to drop off Lux and visiting Korneff. Oskar then informed Vittlar of his intentions to keep what was found, giving his reasons.

After ending their day and making arrangements to meet again, they meet up three days later with a surprise for Vittlar from Oskar. Soon it is identifed whom the object belongs. Vittlar goes on to testify the goings on after they had commandeered a streetcar and thus ran into someone about to be executed from Oskar’s past from the post office during the war and the execution was going to take place where Vittlar’s mother lived near the rye field, which both protested. When Oskar drums at the execution though, it puts them off and Vittlar becomes bothered by Oskar’s indifference to success, which Vittlar hadn’t experienced, this being when it’s realized the reason it being Oskar whom was given up to the police and how they still could have stayed friends. Then a jump to present and on Oskar’s 30th birthday, his lawyer gives the news the police reopened the case due to uncovering the real culprit of the crime, to Oskar’s dismay. Now he’ll have to leave his comfy, life-blocking bed, which he’d stayed in for nearly 2 years and contemplated going to America to be with his Grandfather. Then it seems Oskar has the longest elevator ride as he awaits to be arrested and also at present contemplating his future and what to do now he’s thirty. He seems to digress into nervous confusion and being obsessed by running into the black witch and the poem accompanying it. Strange story, vast and not half bad with its winding interlinking characters.